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Tag Archive for: Budgeting

At the end of each year, I review my personal finances to see how I’m progressing towards my goals. I also take stock to see if I need to make any course corrections. I refer to this annual ritual as getting my financial house in order. It has proven to be a worthwhile exercise over the years. It’s helped me navigate the inevitable peaks and valleys, and also review my financial goals annually. It especially helped when it came to handling student loan debt.

Student Loan Debt

While I am no longer handling student loan debt, there was a time when I did. While studying for my bachelor’s degree, I borrowed money to help pay for tuition, fees, and housing expenses. Fortunately, I was able to work part-time in school, and full-time during the summers. When I graduated, I had what I considered a modest level of debt.

The Realization of Repayment

After graduating, I remember receiving my student loan statement and payment slips in the mail. It had been several months since graduation. I hadn’t thought much about handling my student loan debt. Because I deferred my principal and interest payments while in school, I didn’t know exactly how much I owed. I didn’t even know when my payments were due. I can still remember looking at my loan statement and seeing how much I owed and the monthly amount due. Then, I counted the number of payment slips. I realized it was going to be quite some time before I could pay my loans off in full.

Reality set in. Having taken some finance classes while in school, I knew the high interest rates on my loans would cause interest to accrue rapidly on the remaining principal balance. The longer it took me to pay off my loans, the more it would cost. So, I sat down and developed a plan. I set up a monthly budget to manage my finances and pay off my student loans as soon as possible. This was the start of getting my financial house in order.

Discovering Repayment Options

Since that time, student loans, both federal and private, have greatly evolved. There are now many more repayment options available to students and parents to help them handle student loan debt. These include various income-driven repayment plans, federal loan consolidation, and private student loan refinancing. Each of these options has distinctive features and eligibility requirements, so it makes sense to compare them to one another to see if any meet your needs. You can learn more about federal student loan repayment plan options by visiting the Department of Education’s Federal Student Aid website. Learn more about student loan refinancing and loan consolidation, and which one may be right for you.

Making a Repayment Plan

Creating a solid financial plan and sticking to it is an important part of any person’s financial well-being. If you haven’t already done so, I highly encourage you to review your financial situation, create a plan, and set a monthly budget. If you need help getting started, U-fi offers several tools including budgeting strategies, worksheets, and financial wellness tips.

Once you’ve created your plan, be sure to review it at least once per year, as your goals and/or financial situation may change. This way you can make any needed adjustments to ensure you stay on track. By keeping your financial house in order you can increase the likelihood of achieving financial success.

Does your January credit card statement have you feeling blue? Find out how personal loans could provide credit relief.

It Happens to the Best of Us

The holidays have come and gone. You may be feeling a bit relieved that all the seasonal hustle and bustle is over. Sure, it may be a bit cold outside. Sure, work is back in full swing. But, things are looking good with your New Year’s resolutions. You’re feeling optimistic and energized.

Then, you receive your January credit card bill. Whoa, the new balance is much higher than you expected. As you go down the list of purchases on your statement you ask yourself, “Did I really spend that much?” You also notice the available credit on your credit card is pretty low. There are some big purchases coming up in your future. You were planning on using your credit card to pay for them. Now, you no longer have enough available credit to pay for everything as planned.

With average credit card APRs over 16%, and many exceeding 20%, you know if you don’t pay your balance in full you’ll be hit with a hefty finance charge, which will be added to your outstanding credit card balance. And even worse, if you’re late making the minimum payment that’s due, you could be hit with a penalty APR, which can be as high as 29.99%.

Personal Loans Could Provide Credit Relief

This is where personal loans could provide credit relief. Unlike a credit card, which is a revolving line of credit, a personal loan is an unsecured loan that doesn’t require any collateral, such as a car or house. Personal loans come with a specific repayment period, usually between 1 and 7 years. Fixed interest rates are more common than variable interest rates, and some lenders will offer you a choice.

The main reason people take out personal loans is to pay off existing debt, such as high interest rate credit cards or loans. Other common reasons include making major purchases, for home improvement projects, for special occasions like weddings, to take a vacation, and to pay off medical bills.

Personal loans can range from as little as $1,000 to as high as $100,000. APRs vary widely among lenders and are based on the borrower’s (or co-signer’s) credit history, annual income, repayment term selected, and type of interest rate chosen. Some personal loans even come with money saving automatic payment discounts and loyalty discounts.

Tip: Some lenders charge upfront fees, which add to the total cost of the loan, so be sure to take that into account before choosing a lender.

A really nice feature for personal loans is how quick and easy the process can be. If you submit a completed loan application, you can receive a decision in a matter of minutes, and if approved, receive funds in your bank account as soon as the next business day, provided your application has no typos or errors.

Now that the holidays are over, you may be suffering from the post-holiday credit card blues. If so, check out a personal loan for credit relief from U-fi’s partner. It just may be what the doctor ordered.

When you’ve recently entered the workforce, balancing repaying student loans and a budget can be a challenge. This is especially true if you have a standard entry-level salary. As the cost of higher education continues to rise, it becomes increasingly difficult to manage high monthly loan payments. You also need to worry about everyday expenses like rent, car payments, utilities, and groceries. At times, it feels like you have to make a choice between repaying student loans and living your life.

No matter what some newspaper columnists might lead you to believe, defaulting on your loans is never a good idea. Instead, tap into that survival instinct you developed in the classroom. Get serious about repaying those student loans – the smart way. Here are five ways to manage your loan payments as a young professional.

Stay in contact with your loan servicers.

There are generally two categories of student loans: federal and private. Regardless of the category, student loan servicers handles billing, payments, customer inquiries, and other administrative services for your loan. Servicers help you navigate loan repayment systems, find the right repayment plan, and answer your student loan questions. If you don’t know who services your federal loans, you can find out at nslds.ed.gov. This site lists all of your federal loans, along with the contact information for your servicer. To obtain contact information for your private loan servicer, review your lender’s website or call their toll-free number.

Know which questions to ask.

The questions you should ask depend on your loan type. For federal loans, ask if you’re on the right payment schedule for your financial situation. There are a variety of repayment options available. Your servicer uses information about your job, income, and federal loan amount borrowed to help you find the repayment plan that’s best for you. Options include payments based on your current income, or payments that increase periodically over the life of your loan. Whichever option you choose, remember to keep a long-term view when making decisions about repayment schedules. Consider the interest implications of any option. Private loans are different. You selected repayment terms at the time of application. Information about your private loan rates, terms, and repayment can be obtained from your private loan servicer. They can also offer information and support throughout the life of your loan.

Consider consolidation.

Depending on what type of loan(s) you have, consolidation may help you save money. If you have one or more federal loans, a federal consolidation loan can combine your loans into a new loan with a blended interest rate. It may also extend your repayment period. When you talk with your servicers, you may want to discuss this option. You can find more information about consolidation and federal loan repayment at the Federal Student Aid website.

Private student loan refinancing allows you to replace your existing private and/or federal student loans with a new private student loan under different terms. If you are repaying multiple student loans, want to lower your monthly payment, or if your interest rates are higher than you would like, you may want to consider private loan refinancing. Private student loans require a credit check, and you can often get a lower interest rate with a cosigner. Most lenders provide loans with no application or origination fees. You may also prepay your loan at any time without penalty. You will have the opportunity to see your rates and terms before finalizing your loan.

Do your research.

If you have student loans with high interest rates, refinancing with a private loan can be a great option. They may allow you to save money over the life of your loans with a lower interest rate. But private loan refinancing isn’t right for everyone. For instance, if you have federal loans that carry special repayment benefits or forgiveness programs, it might be best to explore federal loan consolidation. There are unique benefits to both, so be sure to do your research.

Stay current on your monthly student loan payments.

The consequences of defaulting on education loans are very serious. If you’re not able to make your payments, contact your student loan servicer before becoming delinquent. They have trained representatives who can help you find the best solution for your needs. If you lose your job or experience other difficulties, you may be eligible for deferments or forbearances. These mean you may stop making payments for a period of time.

When it comes to repaying student loans, there are many ways to build a healthy financial future. Staying in touch with your servicer and being aware of the options available to you are some of the best ways to make smart financial decisions.