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Credit Card

If you’re reading this, you probably have at least one credit card already. Credit cards can be a helpful tool when used appropriately, including helping you establish credit and build your credit score. However, you can also damage your credit score if you develop bad habits with your credit cards. Here are some tips to help you avoid going down the wrong path so you can better manage your finances.

Looking for a New Credit Card?

If you’re in the market for a credit card, there are some important factors to keep in mind. First, do you already have a credit card? If so, why do you need an additional card? Typically, one is all you really need. If you open several new accounts within a short period of time, your credit score could be damaged. You could be perceived as a higher credit risk because you increased your capacity to take on more debt. This might ultimately be hard to repay.

If you’re looking for your first credit card, be sure to compare different offers and find the card that will work best for you. Here are some things to look for in a credit card:

  • Find a card with the lowest interest rate
  • Avoid outrageous fees (make sure you read all the fine print to understand what fees can be charged)
  • Be cautious of low introductory interest rates that can increase greatly after their initial low interest period

Managing Your Existing Credit Cards

Once you have a credit card, it’s best to have a solid game plan in advance. Sticking to your strategy ensures you won’t get in trouble financially and find yourself with an impossibly high balance.

Credit Card Goals

Here are four goals that will help you stay in control of your credit cards:

  1. Try to pay your balance in full each month. Think of your credit card as an extension of your bank account. That way, you won’t be tempted to charge more than you can afford. Just remember not to charge more than you could pay if you had used your debit card.
  2. If you can’t pay your balance in full, try not to carry much of a balance from month to month. Make a goal to pay more than the minimum monthly payment due. This will help you pay down your balance as quickly as possible. Keep in mind the balance you are carrying is also charged interest, which can make that original purchase more expensive.
  3. Don’t be late with any of your payments. Make sure you know your monthly payment due date. Even if you plan to pay the balance in full, it’s important to make that payment on time. You may want to set a reminder for yourself so you won’t miss that date. If you’re late by even one day, your credit card company may charge a higher interest rate and late fees. Additionally, being late on a payment may lower your credit score.
  4. Avoid impulse purchases and cash advances. Just because you have a credit card doesn’t mean you’re obligated to use it. Although it may be tempting to buy something expensive on credit, it’s better to take your time and save for that purchase. Remember that using your credit card to buy something expensive this month means paying for it over several months. And, you’ll end up paying a lot more than that original purchase price with the added interest charges. Finally, don’t use your credit card for cash advances at the ATM. You could be charged a fee, and may also pay a higher rate of interest on that transaction.

Use Credit Responsibly

Remember, credit cards can be a helpful financial tool when used responsibly. Do you currently have a balance with a high interest rate? Are you looking for a smart way to pay off that debt? A personal loan is a solution worth exploring to pay off your high rate credit card balances.

Does your January credit card statement have you feeling blue? Find out how personal loans could provide credit relief.

It Happens to the Best of Us

The holidays have come and gone. You may be feeling a bit relieved that all the seasonal hustle and bustle is over. Sure, it may be a bit cold outside. Sure, work is back in full swing. But, things are looking good with your New Year’s resolutions. You’re feeling optimistic and energized.

Then, you receive your January credit card bill. Whoa, the new balance is much higher than you expected. As you go down the list of purchases on your statement you ask yourself, “Did I really spend that much?” You also notice the available credit on your credit card is pretty low. There are some big purchases coming up in your future. You were planning on using your credit card to pay for them. Now, you no longer have enough available credit to pay for everything as planned.

With average credit card APRs over 16%, and many exceeding 20%, you know if you don’t pay your balance in full you’ll be hit with a hefty finance charge, which will be added to your outstanding credit card balance. And even worse, if you’re late making the minimum payment that’s due, you could be hit with a penalty APR, which can be as high as 29.99%.

Personal Loans Could Provide Credit Relief

This is where personal loans could provide credit relief. Unlike a credit card, which is a revolving line of credit, a personal loan is an unsecured loan that doesn’t require any collateral, such as a car or house. Personal loans come with a specific repayment period, usually between 1 and 7 years. Fixed interest rates are more common than variable interest rates, and some lenders will offer you a choice.

The main reason people take out personal loans is to pay off existing debt, such as high interest rate credit cards or loans. Other common reasons include making major purchases, for home improvement projects, for special occasions like weddings, to take a vacation, and to pay off medical bills.

Personal loans can range from as little as $1,000 to as high as $100,000. APRs vary widely among lenders and are based on the borrower’s (or co-signer’s) credit history, annual income, repayment term selected, and type of interest rate chosen. Some personal loans even come with money saving automatic payment discounts and loyalty discounts.

Tip: Some lenders charge upfront fees, which add to the total cost of the loan, so be sure to take that into account before choosing a lender.

A really nice feature for personal loans is how quick and easy the process can be. If you submit a completed loan application, you can receive a decision in a matter of minutes, and if approved, receive funds in your bank account as soon as the next business day, provided your application has no typos or errors.

Now that the holidays are over, you may be suffering from the post-holiday credit card blues. If so, check out a personal loan for credit relief from U-fi From Nelnet’s partner. It just may be what the doctor ordered.

You’re in college and on your own, but you may still experience the occasional financial pitfall. Below are money mistakes many students make, and some tips on how to avoid them.

Financial Pitfall #1: Spending all your living expense money early in the semester.

You’ve probably set aside spending money for personal expenses if you live off campus. Or, you may have financial aid funds to use for room, board, or other educational expenses. That money needs to last through the entire semester, but many students spend it within the first few months. How can you avoid spending your money too early? Use these financial management tips to help develop a monthly spending plan.

Financial Pitfall #2: Not taking advantage of part-time employment opportunities.

Most schools offer part-time employment options for students through Federal Work-Study, and by posting on- and off-campus jobs. You might worry that a job will conflict with academic work, but studies show that students who work between 15 and 20 hours while in school are generally more confident and successful. Having a job helps bring in money regularly throughout the semester and can help build your resume. Your college financial aid office awards Federal Work-Study and generally posts related job opportunities. Work-Study is based on financial need and requires a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) . Other part-time jobs may be posted by the Career Office, Student Affairs, or other places on campus. Check your school website for more information.

Financial Pitfall #3: Accumulating credit card debt.

You’ve probably already received credit card offers in the mail. You may also notice giveaways and travel rewards that make the offers sound appealing. Be careful – as a new credit card holder, your interest rates will be high, and credit card offers tend to have many fees attached. Be sure to read the fine print and note that the initial low interest rate offered may expire in just a few months. You can quickly accumulate credit card balances that can swell out of control, especially if you’re only making minimum payments. Here’s an overview of credit card pros and cons, along with additional information about other matters to consider.

Financial Pitfall #4: Taking out student loans without understanding them.

Student loans are so common that students often see them as just another type of financial aid. There is an important difference; student loans must be paid back. While student loans can be a useful way to pay for your education, keep your borrowing to a minimum. Know what your monthly loan payment will be when you get out of school. Understand what you can realistically afford to borrow. It is also important to know the types of loans, the terms of those loans, and the options available. To get a general idea of what your monthly loan payment may be when you finish school, Federal Student Aid provides an easy-to-use repayment calculator.

The earlier you can learn the basics about managing your finances, the better off you’ll be in the long run. These simple steps should help you build the foundation you need for a successful financial future.

Thinking about applying for a new private student loan, or refinancing your existing federal and private student loans? Expect the lender to check your credit history and credit score. They do this to ensure you are not a credit risk. You can proactively take steps to improve your credit health and raise your credit score. Start with understanding what’s in your credit report, and what student loan lenders are looking for.

What is Credit?

Have you ever taken out a student loan or credit card? If so, you entered into an agreement to receive funds that must be paid back later. Unlike credit cards, student loans are repaid in installments over a set number of payments. This term is usually 5 to 25 years.

When you take out a student loan, most lenders or servicers notify at least one of the three major credit reporting agencies. These are Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion. They do this so they can include the new account on your credit report as a trade line. Each trade line contains detailed information. This information includes account name and number, loan type, date opened, original and current balance, payment status, and monthly payment.

The lender or servicer notifies the credit agencies of all loan activity. This activity includes payment date, amount of payment applied to principal and interest, and timeliness of payments. The credit agency records this information, which makes up part of your credit history.

Understanding Your Credit Report

While each credit reporting agency’s reporting format may be slightly different, they essentially include the same information:

  • Personal Information, such as your name, address (current and previous), Social Security number, date of birth, and other information that identifies who you are.
  • Credit History, including your open and closed accounts, original loan amounts, current balances, and payment history.
  • Public Records, such as delinquent accounts, liens, and bankruptcies. Public records can remain on your credit report for many years, which will affect your ability to obtain future credit.
  • Credit Inquiries, which are placed on your credit report when you request credit. Credit inquiries remain on your file for two years.

Tip: Federal law entitles you to a free copy of your credit report each year from all three credit reporting agencies. Take advantage of this and check your report from each credit bureau annually. This ensures your personal information is accurate and up to date. To get a free credit report, visit www.AnnualCreditReport.com or call 877-FACTACT. If something on your report looks inaccurate, be sure to contact the credit agency immediately to have it addressed. Unfortunately, the credit reports will not include your credit score.

What Student Loan Lenders Look For When Checking Your Credit

When making a credit decision, private student loan lenders check your credit report and credit score. They do this to determine whether you are an acceptable risk, and what interest rate they should charge you. If you have a cosigner, lender checks their credit report and credit score too.  Most lenders, like U-fi From Nelnet, will want to see an adequate credit history, a track record of making on-time payments, how much debt you have outstanding, and a good credit score. Lenders also ask how much income you have to determine whether you, or your cosigner, have enough monthly income to make monthly payments.

To increase your chances of being approved and receiving a low interest rate for a new student loan or a student refinance loan, you and/or your cosigner will want to have at least two open trade lines, be no more than 30 days past due on more than one account, and have no public records for the past five years. Most lenders will also want to see a good credit score. While each lender is different, if you have a credit score above 700, you will generally be considered a good credit risk.

Tip: When shopping for a private student loan or student refinance loan you should complete all your applications within a short window (e.g. 30 days), since multiple credit inquiries within a brief time period will have little impact on your credit score.

How Does Your Credit History Affect Your Credit Score?

Your credit score is a number that summarizes your credit risk at any moment in time. While there are several types of credit scores, 90% of lending decisions use a FICO score. Fair Isaac Corporation creates the FICO score. FICO scores range from a low of 300 to a high of 850, with higher being better. FICO scores are made up of the following:

  • 35%: Payment History – have you made your past payments on time?
  • 30%: Amount Owed – how much debt do you owe and how much of your available credit has been used?
  • 15%: Length of Credit History – how long have you been using credit?
  • 10%: New Credit – how much of your debt has been opened recently?
  • 10%: Types of Credit Used – do you have different types of credit such as credit cards, installment loans, and mortgages?

Tip: FICO scores can change from month to month due to several factors. Not having too much debt, and making full payments on time, over a long period gives lenders more confidence you will repay them. That increases the likelihood they will extend you credit at a lower interest rate.

Understanding what’s on your credit report and how it impacts your ability to get a good credit rate is extremely important. If you notice something incorrect on your credit report, call the credit agency immediately. Work with them to correct any problems. A better credit history and higher credit score means a better shot at approval and a low interest rate. Your credit could save you a lot of money on your student loans. It can also ensure additional credit is there for you when you need it most.

Spring break is a time that college students look forward to all winter. It’s your chance to escape the rigors of the classroom and relax on a warm beach or other exciting destination. Although spring break can be fun, the costs associated can add up quickly. With a little planning and preparation, you can enjoy a week away from studying without emptying your bank account. Use these five planning tips for a successful spring break.

1. Set Your Budget

The best thing you can do is plan your spring break trip a few months in advance. This will not only give you ample time to get everything organized, but you’ll have more time to save and plan for your trip. Determine what your budget is and let that guide you’re planning. Then, take the time to research destinations and estimate the costs for each option. Transportation and lodging will likely make up the bulk of your cost, but don’t underestimate your other expenses during your trip. You may find that some trips are just too expensive based on your resources and budget.

2. Split the Bill

If you’re driving to your destination, ride with friends and split the cost of fuel. Additionally, you may be able to save on hotel costs by sharing a room with friends. Those extra savings can go a long way and will give you more funds for other activities during your trip.

3. Borrow – Don’t Buy

Create a packing list and figure out if there are items you don’t have but know you will need. It’s a pretty safe bet that buying something will be more expensive at your destination. Try to borrow anything you might need from friends or family, especially if it’s an item you’re unlikely to use after the trip. Try your best to anticipate everything you’ll need during your trip and pack accordingly.

4. Find Fun Closer to Home

Although it sounds great to take a big trip somewhere far away, you can have just as much fun trying new things closer to home. Remember, the entire purpose of spring break is to take a break from studying, relax, and enjoy yourself. Sometimes, that might simply be going home to see family and friends. And the best part of that kind of spring break is you won’t have to spend much money at all! Check out tourist destinations in your current city to explore new activities. You’d be surprised at how many things are nearby that you may have overlooked previously. Get creative and enjoy yourself.

5. Pay as You Go

Ideally, you want to be able to pay for your spring break trip with savings and not use high interest rate credit cards or even student loans to fund your adventure. Again, try to set a budget for your trip and then keep your spending within your budget. Don’t be tempted into spending more than you have or feel pressured into trying to keep up with someone else’s crazy spending sprees. Spring break can create memories that last a lifetime, but you don’t want create a financial burden that lasts a lifetime either!

Enjoy your spring break and the time away from your classes. Remember to be safe and protect yourself and your belongings while traveling. A little planning and budgeting will help you have a great time and feel good about your finances when you return.