Tag Archive for: Debt

When it comes to your credit, you may have heard the terms “hard credit check” or “soft credit check” – but what do they mean?

Soft Credit Check

When potential creditors request your credit report, they may use a soft check or inquiry. This type of inquiry provides a basic check of your credit score. A soft credit check will not have a negative impact on your credit score. Creditors don’t need your explicit permission to request this information, as it just shows what you would see on your own credit report.

For an example of a soft inquiry, say you received an application for student loan refinancing in the mail from a company like U-fi. Before you received those offers, the lender likely pre-screened your credit with a soft check. U-fi uses soft credit checks to see if you meet the minimum criteria for refinancing and find out what rates you qualify for. Getting your rate with U-fi won’t impact your credit score and it won’t cost you a cent.

Soft checks of your credit score are typically done by employers, insurance companies, landlords, and utility companies. They do soft checks on your credit report to understand how responsible you are with your finances. These organizations use your credit score and history to determine the likelihood that you’ll pay on time. This type of information can sometimes factor into whether you’ll have to pay a deposit for utility services.

Hard Credit Check

A hard credit check or inquiry is different than a soft check as it does have an impact on your credit score.  Because a hard credit check will affect your credit, it does require your permission.

A hard credit check is usually triggered by your active request (i.e., application) for a loan or extension of credit. When you apply for a student loan or another type of loan, the creditor checks your credit report to evaluate your eligibility. With a hard credit inquiry, the lender looks at your credit report in much more depth to determine your creditworthiness before granting or denying you that loan.

Hard credit checks are often done by mortgage lenders, auto lenders, and credit card companies. These types of credit checks do have an impact on your credit score because they show you are actively seeking new credit. While a hard check usually has a limited impact on your credit score, its impact depends on your individual circumstances. You may still want to minimize the number of hard inquiries on your credit report just to be safe, since a high number of hard checks in a short time shows potential lenders that you might need a lot of money. This can be seen as a bad indicator if you are looking for a student loan.

If you’re considering refinancing your student loans, U-fi can identify the best rate you qualify for using a soft credit check and we’ll only trigger a hard check when you’re ready to accept the loan.

Credit Score Tip: When you’re looking for a loan pre-qualification or a rate quote, make sure to read the fine print to find out what type of initial check the lender will make on your credit report. Just remember that once you formally apply for the loan, the creditor needs to make a hard credit inquiry and review your credit score and history in much greater detail.

If you need to borrow private loans to help pay for college, be smart about it. That’s what U-fi is here for, and we’ll only use a soft inquiry to check the rates you qualify for. Get started with U-fi today.

Another new year brings another set of resolutions — many of which involve making new financial goals. Whether you’re currently in school or have been in the workforce for a few years, it’s smart to make these changes now in order to set yourself up for future financial success.

But it’s one thing to make financial goals, and another thing to stick with them. Here’s a few tips to save more money and budget effectively to keep yourself on track throughout the year.

Create A Budget. Then Write It Down.

This is important. Many of us budget in our heads, but don’t take the time to write it down. Dig out your notebook — or use our budgeting worksheet. Then, follow these steps to set up an effective budget that helps you make responsible decisions with your funds.

  • Determine a timeline for your budget — will you track it by week, month, semester, or year?
  • Separate your expenses into categories like housing, transportation, and entertainment
  • Revisit the document on a regular basis to update and track payments

The way you set up your budget is up to you. The important thing is to get it written down.

Wants Versus Needs

Obviously, there are things you need to pay for. Tuition, fees, housing, and food can all add up. The line between “needs” and “wants” can be blurry, so it’s important to clearly define them in your budget.

For example, if you’re paying for a school meal plan, going out with friends is a “want,” even though you need to eat. That doesn’t mean you have to give up eating out or spending money on things you want — in fact, it’s often important to do so!

By determining which expenses are “wants” and which are “needs,” you’ll be able to spend your money responsibly without going overboard.

Financial Goals Quick Tip: Consider giving yourself a set allowance to spend on your “wants.” If you’re saving up for something big, determine which “wants” you’re willing to spend less on each week.

Credit or Debit?

When it comes to the debate between credit cards and debit cards, there’s really no right or wrong answer. In many cases, it’s smart to use both. However, it’s especially important to use your credit card responsibly.

  • Use your credit card for one small charge each month — otherwise, keep it for emergencies only
  • If an emergency does happen, stop your monthly charges and instead use that money to pay off your credit card
  • When using your debit card, keep an eye on your checking account to make sure you aren’t spending more than you have

By handling your spending this way, you can build your credit score without relying on credit card debt to fund all of your wants. Your debit card gives you the convenience and security of not having to carry cash everywhere.

Loans and Financial Aid

Chances are you’ve had to borrow some money to pay for at least a portion of your education. If you’ve taken out a variety of different loans, it can be difficult to keep track of what you really owe.

When you’re considering taking out a loan, it’s helpful to research repayment options to find the loan that is right for you. If you find your payments are too high, you may consider refinancing all your loans into one loan with a potentially lower interest rate. Refinancing means you’ll pay less each month on your student loans – if this sounds like a fit for you, U-fi can help you start the refinancing process.

Setting up your financial goals doesn’t mean sacrificing experiences like going to the movies or eating out with friends. By budgeting and defining your wants and needs, you make smart choices that count.

Want to make another smart financial decision? See how U-fi can help you refinance your loans.

The majority of college students now graduate with student loan debt. But, keeping your borrowing to a minimum and setting a budget makes repayment easier when it comes time for repayment. Learn more about understanding your expenses and financial resources each semester to effectively determine your budget needs.

Understanding Education Costs

First, you need to understand what your direct education costs are going to be each semester. These are costs by your school that include tuition, fees, books, supplies, and room and board. Students living off campus also need to identify extra monthly expenses, such as rent, utilities, groceries, transportation, etc. Use our simple budgeting worksheet to help get you started.

Sources of Income

Once you’ve identified your expenses, take note of what resources you have to pay those costs.

Financial Aid

To find out if you’re eligible for federal and some state financial aid programs, you need to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Remember—you need to complete the FAFSA every year starting in October for the following school year.

If you receive financial aid, the school applies the funds to your direct school costs, such as tuition and fees. If there are any financial aid funds left over, you receive that amount to use for other expenses. These funds are intended to cover the costs you incur during that entire semester—so don’t rush out and spend it all at once!

Additional Income

Check in on any other sources of income available to you. If you work while going to school, use that income as a resource for expenses. Perhaps you also have financial support from parents or other family members. Once you’ve identified all sources of income, you may realize that your expenses are greater than the income or resources you have to pay those expenses. At this point, it’s a good idea to see if there are ways to cut your expenses.

Student Loans

For some students, student loans help pay some of the expenses not covered by other income sources. Successfully identifying your expenses and available resources gives you a good idea of what you need to borrow. If you do need to take out a student loan, only borrow what you need and nothing more.

Student loans can be a great resource when used responsibly. Remember to use your federal student loans first before exploring private loan options. If you need to pursue a private loan, visit U-fi.com to learn more about funding solutions and other resources for managing your finances.

College is difficult enough when you’re trying to get through classes and exams. Put yourself in a better position to focus on your studies by setting a budget so you don’t need to worry about your finances. Remember to continually revisit your budget and develop a solid plan for understanding your expenses each semester.

As graduation season approaches, you may notice more and more ads promoting student loan refinance. You may also receive offers from companies offering to lower your rate on your student loans. What does all of this mean to you? Learn what your options are and create the student loan repayment strategy that makes sense for you.

What is Refinancing?

Refinancing means using a new loan with better interest rates and/or terms to pay off an existing loan. Refinancing is commonly used with home mortgages, but can also be a great option for your student loans. Check out When to Consider Refinancing Student Loans for additional insight into potential reasons you might consider refinancing your student loans.

Who Can Benefit from Refinancing Student Loans?

If your goal is to obtain a lower interest rate and ultimately lower the total repayment costs of your loans, then refinancing is worth exploring. This is especially true if you have older private loans that may have a high interest rate, and you feel you may qualify for a lower interest rate now. Some consumers may also want to lower their overall monthly payment. They can achieve this from either a lower interest rate, or by extending the term (i.e., length of repayment) on their loan. Finally, if you have multiple loans with different lenders or servicers, refinancing combines your loans into one. This means you’ll only have to work with one entity for your student loans in the future.

What Types of Loans Can Be Refinanced?

Most companies that offer student loan refinancing allow you to include private loans and federal student loans when refinancing. (Private loans are loans made by a bank or other financial services provider you received to help fund your education. Federal loans (i.e., Direct Loans, Stafford Loans, Perkins Loans) are made by the government.) To qualify, your loans may need to be in their grace period or in repayment to be included in a refinance loan. That means you need to be out of school when you refinance those loans. You can include multiple loans from a number of different loan holders in one refinance loan. Make sure you know all of the student loans you have, and which company or organization is responsible for servicing those loans before refinancing.

Considerations and Cautions Before Refinancing

While refinancing might sound good to you, there are some things you need to consider.

  • Don’t just look at the low teaser rates. The lowest advertised rate is usually available to borrowers with the best credit scores who select the shortest repayment term. These options may not work for your situation.
  • Understand who will actually service your new refinance loan. In many instances, the lender you initially work with may not be the organization you make payments to, or rely on for customer service.
  • If you are considering including federal loans in your refinance, ensure the benefits outweigh any loss of protections or benefits only available with federal loans. For instance, if you include federal loans in a new private refinance loan, you lose access to income-driven repayment plans and the possibility for Public Service Loan Forgiveness that might be available with your federal loans.

The bottom line is, do your research and understand what course of action is best for you. Each person has unique circumstances and concerns, so refinancing may not always be best. You can learn more about refinance loans and other related articles by visiting U-fi.com.

Interested in student loan refinancing? Take the next step toward lower monthly payments.

You’ve finished off the leftover turkey and dressing and have shifted gears into holiday shopping mode. As another year comes to a close, it’s a good time to look back on how your budget planning went this past year.

After an assessment, you can begin to find ways to improve your financial well-being in the upcoming year. In order to be prepared for a bright financial future in the New Year, it’s important to set your budget, contribute to your savings, and pay down any high interest debt.

Now is the Time for Budget Planning

Do you know how much you spent this year on utilities, groceries, housing, or entertainment? Once you have an idea of how much you’re spending on certain categories, you can estimate your projected expenses each month and use budget planning to find places to cut expenses.

There are a number of apps that can assist you with tracking and categorizing your spending, but you can also do it on your own by entering your expenses into a spreadsheet. If you use your debit card for most purchases, you can use your online bank statement to help you identify your expenses. Don’t forget to account for the cash you spend if you want a true picture of all your expenses.

When setting your budget, you’ll likely have fixed and recurring expenses for housing, transportation, student loans, utilities, and other similar areas. Then, you’ll need to set an amount for variable expenses like groceries, clothing, and entertainment.

Knowing your income each month will help you set goals. If you have a steady job, you probably have a consistent weekly or monthly income and can use that to start your budget. Your monthly expenses should be less than your available income each month.

If this is not the case, you can review your expenses to identify areas to trim back and reduce your spending each month. Once you’ve created a budget, try to stick to it as best you can each month. That way, you’ll stay on track and not get into a position of having to use credit cards or possibly getting behind on some of your bills.

Save, Save, Save—The Sooner You Start the Better

Even if you’re in your 20’s, it’s never too early to include retirement in your budget planning. If you start with small contributions, you can make it a habit and priority. If your employer offers a 401(k) plan and matches your contributions, take full advantage of the opportunity for free money.

It’s also important to set aside funds for unexpected expenses or emergencies. A good rule of thumb is to have three to six months of income in a savings account that you can access for those unplanned events. Not only will this give you peace of mind knowing that you have your own safety net, but it will help you avoid putting large charges on a credit card that will likely incur high interest fees.

Pay Down High Interest Rate Debt

Whether you’re paying off a student loan, a car, or a credit card balance, it’s always an accomplishment to know you have extra income to go toward something else (like saving).

If you can allocate some extra resources to pay down your debt, it’s generally best to start by tackling the account with the highest interest rate. That might be a credit card balance that seems like it never gets smaller because of the interest that keeps adding up each month.

Another goal you might have is to simply pay something off with a smaller balance just to get that sense of accomplishment and then move that money toward paying down other debt. It might make sense to look at debt consolidation or refinancing where you may benefit from paying off higher rate loans or debt with a lower interest rate personal loan. This is especially helpful with high rate credit cards. See our article on using personal loans to cure those post-holiday credit card blues. You can find other helpful articles and resources at U-fi.com. All of us at U-fi wish you a successful and prosperous new year!

Have you ever applied for a loan from a bank and wondered why you received a certain interest rate? I remember when I applied for a loan to buy my first house. I’d taken out a few student loans that I paid off, but I was still making payments on my auto loan, and had a couple of open credit cards. Since I’d never had a late payment, I assumed I would qualify for the lowest advertised interest rate. I had no idea what my credit score was.

After submitting my loan application, to my surprise, I wasn’t offered the lowest rate. “But why?” I asked the mortgage loan officer. I had never missed a payment on any of my loans or credit cards. Isn’t that what they should be concerned about? They told me my credit score wasn’t high enough to warrant their lowest rate.

After some research, I discovered the quality of the applicant’s credit score is one of the most important factors lenders consider when deciding to whether to extend credit. It’s also taken into account when deciding what terms and rates are offered. And, that a person’s credit report determines the person’s credit score.

What is a credit score?

A credit score is a numerical representation of your credit risk. That essentially means how likely you are to pay back the loan. Credit scores range from 300 to 850, and are used by lenders to easily and objectively evaluate your credit risk. Higher scores usually mean less credit risk. Most lenders require a minimum credit score before they offer you a loan. They also create credit score tiers used to determine what interest rate they offer. That’s why you should have as high a credit score as possible before applying for any loan, regardless of type.

What can you do to raise your credit score?

The first thing to know is it takes time to improve your credit score. While you can ruin your credit score very quickly, it can take several years of good behavior to increase it. This is especially true if you have had a credit mishap like a missed payment. Below are six suggestions to help you improve (or maintain) your credit score.

  1. Review your credit report annually. At least once per year, check your credit report for accuracy, and that nothing is on it that shouldn’t be. Reviewing your credit report can also help you protect yourself from identify theft, which could ruin your good credit. If you have any questions about your credit report, or wish to dispute an error, immediately contact the credit reporting agency that issued the report. Tip: You can get one free credit report per year from each of the three major credit reporting agencies simply by visiting www.AnnualCreditReport.com and requesting your free credit report. Unfortunately, you won’t find your credit score on your credit report. Some credit card providers have partnerships with one of the three large credit bureaus to provide free credit scores to their customers. Check to see if your credit card provider has such an arrangement.
  2. Pay your bills on time. This may seem like a no-brainer, but it’s important to make your payments on time, as any late or missed payments are likely reported to the credit bureaus. If you’ve missed a payment, get your account current and stay current. The longer you go without missing a payment, the more your credit score should increase.
  3. Pay down your credit card balances. When your credit cards have high balances, it gives you a high debt-to-credit ratio (also known as utilization rate) and can signal credit providers and lenders that you are facing financial difficulty.Tip: Don’t move your balance from one credit card to another as this won’t help.
  4. Only apply for a new loan or credit card when you truly need one. When you apply for a new credit card, you add a “hard inquiry” to your credit report, which causes your credit score to drop slightly in the short term. You may also be adding more new debt than you can afford to repay, both of which could negatively impact your credit.
  5. Enroll in automatic payments. Enroll in automatic payments through your credit card and loan providers to have payments automatically debited from your bank account. Most student loan providers offer an interest rate discount for automatic payments, so there is that added benefit as well. Tip: When setting up automatic payments on credit cards, if you choose to make only the minimum required payment, you could be rolling over large balances each month and get hit with high interest charges.

How Does It All Help?

Having a clean credit report and a high credit score can help you in many ways, including lowering the cost of borrowing, obtaining insurance, setting up housing utilities, getting a job offer, and more. If you are having trouble making your payments, be sure to speak with your credit card provider or lender before you miss a payment. It’s in their best interest to work with you to find a mutually agreeable solution, so you may be able to work out an arrangement that meets your needs.

If you’re reading this, you probably have at least one credit card already. Credit cards can be a helpful tool when used appropriately, including helping you establish credit and build your credit score. However, you can also damage your credit score if you develop bad habits with your credit cards. Here are some tips to help you avoid going down the wrong path so you can better manage your finances. You can also check out our Credit Card Tips sheet for additional information.

Looking for a New Credit Card?

If you’re in the market for a credit card, there are some important factors to keep in mind. First, do you already have a credit card? If so, why do you need an additional card? Typically, one is all you really need. If you open several new accounts within a short period of time, your credit score could be damaged. You could be perceived as a higher credit risk because you increased your capacity to take on more debt. This might ultimately be hard to repay.

If you’re looking for your first credit card, be sure to compare different offers and find the card that will work best for you. Here are some things to look for in a credit card:

  • Find a card with the lowest interest rate
  • Avoid outrageous fees (make sure you read all the fine print to understand what fees can be charged)
  • Be cautious of low introductory interest rates that can increase greatly after their initial low interest period

Managing Your Existing Credit Cards

Once you have a credit card, it’s best to have a solid game plan in advance. Sticking to your strategy ensures you won’t get in trouble financially and find yourself with an impossibly high balance.

Credit Card Goals

Here are four goals that will help you stay in control of your credit cards:

  1. Try to pay your balance in full each month. Think of your credit card as an extension of your bank account. That way, you won’t be tempted to charge more than you can afford. Just remember not to charge more than you could pay if you had used your debit card.
  2. If you can’t pay your balance in full, try not to carry much of a balance from month to month. Make a goal to pay more than the minimum monthly payment due. This will help you pay down your balance as quickly as possible. Keep in mind the balance you are carrying is also charged interest, which can make that original purchase more expensive.
  3. Don’t be late with any of your payments. Make sure you know your monthly payment due date. Even if you plan to pay the balance in full, it’s important to make that payment on time. You may want to set a reminder for yourself so you won’t miss that date. If you’re late by even one day, your credit card company may charge a higher interest rate and late fees. Additionally, being late on a payment may lower your credit score.
  4. Avoid impulse purchases and cash advances. Just because you have a credit card doesn’t mean you’re obligated to use it. Although it may be tempting to buy something expensive on credit, it’s better to take your time and save for that purchase. Remember that using your credit card to buy something expensive this month means paying for it over several months. And, you’ll end up paying a lot more than that original purchase price with the added interest charges. Finally, don’t use your credit card for cash advances at the ATM. You could be charged a fee, and may also pay a higher rate of interest on that transaction.

Use Credit Responsibly

Remember, credit cards can be a helpful financial tool when used responsibly. Do you currently have a balance with a high interest rate? Are you looking for a smart way to pay off that debt? A personal loan is a solution worth exploring to pay off your high rate credit card balances. You can find more information about personal loan solutions, as well as additional tools and resources at U-fi.com.

Congratulations! You’re graduating soon and will be searching for your first job out of college. It’s an exciting time in your life. However, if you’re like the majority of college students, you’re also graduating with student loan debt. Now is a good time to make sure you’ve got a plan to manage your student loans after you graduate.

Here are some easy steps you can take to set yourself up to successfully manage your student loans.

First, Identify All of Your Student Loans

The best place to start is at the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS). You can find information here about all of your federal loans. This will give you all the details you need to understand how much you’ve borrowed on your federal loans. You can also find out who to contact for questions about your federal student loans.

If you used private loans from a bank or other financial entity, check with your lender to make sure you have the correct loan information.

Next, Get an Idea of What Your Monthly Payments Will Look Like

At StudentLoans.gov you can access a repayment estimator for your federal loans that will give you an idea of what your monthly payment would look like under the different repayment plans available. Depending on your individual circumstances, it’s likely there is a plan that will work for you. If you have relatively low debt and a good salary, you may want to pay off your loans ASAP. The standard 10-year repayment term allows you the quickest and lowest cost method to pay off your loans.

If you have a higher debt load or lower income, there are options that base your student loan payment on your income. Income-driven repayment plans are often helpful since they give you a more affordable monthly payment based on your income. You can learn more about these options as well as how to apply them to your student loans at StudentLoans.gov.

For private loans, visit your lender’s website to access repayment calculators. Or, simply contact your private loan provider for additional information on what monthly repayment amount you can expect.

Know When Your First Payment is Due

With federal loans, you have the ability to postpone payments while you’re enrolled in school at least a half-time. This is also true of some private loans. That means you’ve probably not made any payments on your loans, or perhaps you’ve made some small payments to offset accruing interest. You are also given a grace period on your loans. The grace period is typically six months from your last day of school. The last day is usually considered when you graduate or have dropped below half-time enrollment. At the end of that grace period is when your first payment will be due. Make sure you know when that due date is. That will give you plenty of time to prepare and budget for that new payment.

Know Your Options if you Have Difficulty Making Payments and Need Assistance

There are a number of options for borrowers who encounter situations that make it difficult to manage their student loans. Your student loan servicer will work with you to find a solution, but you have to contact your servicer to get assistance. For example, if your income has changed dramatically you might want to change to an income driven repayment plan or adjust the plan you’re on based on your change in income. Additionally, if you return to school, to pursue a graduate degree for example, you can postpone (or defer) your student loans while you’re back in school. Don’t make the mistake of simply ignoring your student loan payments and damaging your credit score.

As you look forward to graduation and starting a new chapter in your life, just remember to do a little planning and research how to best manage your student loans and find the best repayment plan for your situation. And remember, your student loan servicer is there to help you if you have any questions.

Does your January credit card statement have you feeling blue? Find out how personal loans could provide credit relief.

It Happens to the Best of Us

The holidays have come and gone. You may be feeling a bit relieved that all the seasonal hustle and bustle is over. Sure, it may be a bit cold outside. Sure, work is back in full swing. But, things are looking good with your New Year’s resolutions. You’re feeling optimistic and energized.

Then, you receive your January credit card bill. Whoa, the new balance is much higher than you expected. As you go down the list of purchases on your statement you ask yourself, “Did I really spend that much?” You also notice the available credit on your credit card is pretty low. There are some big purchases coming up in your future. You were planning on using your credit card to pay for them. Now, you no longer have enough available credit to pay for everything as planned.

With average credit card APRs over 16%, and many exceeding 20%, you know if you don’t pay your balance in full you’ll be hit with a hefty finance charge, which will be added to your outstanding credit card balance. And even worse, if you’re late making the minimum payment that’s due, you could be hit with a penalty APR, which can be as high as 29.99%.

Personal Loans Could Provide Credit Relief

This is where personal loans could provide credit relief. Unlike a credit card, which is a revolving line of credit, a personal loan is an unsecured loan that doesn’t require any collateral, such as a car or house. Personal loans come with a specific repayment period, usually between 1 and 7 years. Fixed interest rates are more common than variable interest rates, and some lenders will offer you a choice.

The main reason people take out personal loans is to pay off existing debt, such as high interest rate credit cards or loans. Other common reasons include making major purchases, for home improvement projects, for special occasions like weddings, to take a vacation, and to pay off medical bills.

Personal loans can range from as little as $1,000 to as high as $100,000. APRs vary widely among lenders and are based on the borrower’s (or co-signer’s) credit history, annual income, repayment term selected, and type of interest rate chosen. Some personal loans even come with money saving automatic payment discounts and loyalty discounts.

Tip: Some lenders charge upfront fees, which add to the total cost of the loan, so be sure to take that into account before choosing a lender.

A really nice feature for personal loans is how quick and easy the process can be. If you submit a completed loan application, you can receive a decision in a matter of minutes, and if approved, receive funds in your bank account as soon as the next business day, provided your application has no typos or errors.

Now that the holidays are over, you may be suffering from the post-holiday credit card blues. If so, check out a personal loan for credit relief from U-fi’s partner. It just may be what the doctor ordered.

The holidays are over and the new year brings a new semester. For many students, that means a new round of bills and education expenses. That means it’s a perfect time to evaluate your finances and make sure your budget is in the right place.

If you attended college in the fall, you may have relied on financial aid to help cover your education expenses. With a new semester about to begin, you may want to reconsider your options. Many students still owe a balance from fall semester. Meanwhile, others just realized they may need additional funding to help pay for the upcoming semester. Use this time to take stock of your financial resources and make a plan to ensure everything is covered.

Do you still owe a balance on outstanding charges from your fall semester?

You may be required to fully satisfy outstanding charges before you can complete your enrollment for the next semester. Make sure you take care of the previous balance as soon as possible. That way, you avoid any potential delays with your upcoming enrollment. If you didn’t have enough financial aid or personal resources to pay your prior semester’s bills in full, consider a private loan to help cover what you still owe. You can find private loan solutions at U-fi.com.

Did you apply for financial aid either before or during the previous semester?

It’s always a good idea to apply for financial aid by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, even if you don’t think you’ll qualify. Not everyone qualifies for grants or other “free” money. But, you may qualify for federal student loans, like unsubsidized loans, which are not based on financial need. You can still complete the FAFSA, even after the school year has started. It’s free and doesn’t take much time, so it’s worthwhile to submit. That way, you’ll know you’re not missing out on any financial aid programs.

What are your education expenses going to be in the upcoming semester?

By January, you should have an idea of your direct college expenses are for the upcoming semester. These education expenses including tuition, books, housing, and other costs. Do you have financial aid that pays for everything, or do you still have a gap where additional money is needed? Make sure you look at your full semester and anticipate all of your expenses. Set a budget so you’ll know exactly what your expenses are. Make sure to keep track of what types of income or financial resources can cover those expenses. Use all the financial aid resources available to you, including federal loans, to help pay your costs of attending college. If you still find yourself in need of additional money, you can explore the possibility of a private education loan at U-fi.com and find a solution to help cover your college expenses.

When should you apply for next school year’s financial aid?

In case you missed it, you can now complete the FAFSA starting on October 1 for the following school year. You may only be halfway through the 2018-2019 school year, but it’s already time to submit your FAFSA for the 2019-2020 year. If you haven’t completed the FAFSA for next year, it’s important to get that taken care of as soon as possible. With the earlier submission date for the FAFSA, it’s critical to get your application in as quickly as possible so you don’t miss any priority deadlines for state grant aid or other types of aid that may not be available if you apply too late.

For more tips and resources on planning and paying for college, visit U-fi.com. Remember, now is the time to make sure you have everything in order for the current semester and for the next school year.