Tag Archive for: Finance

When it comes to your credit, you may have heard the terms “hard credit check” or “soft credit check” – but what do they mean?

Soft Credit Check

When potential creditors request your credit report, they may use a soft check or inquiry. This type of inquiry provides a basic check of your credit score. A soft credit check will not have a negative impact on your credit score. Creditors don’t need your explicit permission to request this information, as it just shows what you would see on your own credit report.

For an example of a soft inquiry, say you received an application for student loan refinancing in the mail from a company like U-fi. Before you received those offers, the lender likely pre-screened your credit with a soft check. U-fi uses soft credit checks to see if you meet the minimum criteria for refinancing and find out what rates you qualify for. Getting your rate with U-fi won’t impact your credit score and it won’t cost you a cent.

Soft checks of your credit score are typically done by employers, insurance companies, landlords, and utility companies. They do soft checks on your credit report to understand how responsible you are with your finances. These organizations use your credit score and history to determine the likelihood that you’ll pay on time. This type of information can sometimes factor into whether you’ll have to pay a deposit for utility services.

Hard Credit Check

A hard credit check or inquiry is different than a soft check as it does have an impact on your credit score.  Because a hard credit check will affect your credit, it does require your permission.

A hard credit check is usually triggered by your active request (i.e., application) for a loan or extension of credit. When you apply for a student loan or another type of loan, the creditor checks your credit report to evaluate your eligibility. With a hard credit inquiry, the lender looks at your credit report in much more depth to determine your creditworthiness before granting or denying you that loan.

Hard credit checks are often done by mortgage lenders, auto lenders, and credit card companies. These types of credit checks do have an impact on your credit score because they show you are actively seeking new credit. While a hard check usually has a limited impact on your credit score, its impact depends on your individual circumstances. You may still want to minimize the number of hard inquiries on your credit report just to be safe, since a high number of hard checks in a short time shows potential lenders that you might need a lot of money. This can be seen as a bad indicator if you are looking for a student loan.

If you’re considering refinancing your student loans, U-fi can identify the best rate you qualify for using a soft credit check and we’ll only trigger a hard check when you’re ready to accept the loan.

Credit Score Tip: When you’re looking for a loan pre-qualification or a rate quote, make sure to read the fine print to find out what type of initial check the lender will make on your credit report. Just remember that once you formally apply for the loan, the creditor needs to make a hard credit inquiry and review your credit score and history in much greater detail.

If you need to borrow private loans to help pay for college, be smart about it. That’s what U-fi is here for, and we’ll only use a soft inquiry to check the rates you qualify for. Get started with U-fi today.

You’ve finished off the leftover turkey and dressing and have shifted gears into holiday shopping mode. As another year comes to a close, it’s a good time to look back on how your budget planning went this past year.

After an assessment, you can begin to find ways to improve your financial well-being in the upcoming year. In order to be prepared for a bright financial future in the New Year, it’s important to set your budget, contribute to your savings, and pay down any high interest debt.

Now is the Time for Budget Planning

Do you know how much you spent this year on utilities, groceries, housing, or entertainment? Once you have an idea of how much you’re spending on certain categories, you can estimate your projected expenses each month and use budget planning to find places to cut expenses.

There are a number of apps that can assist you with tracking and categorizing your spending, but you can also do it on your own by entering your expenses into a spreadsheet. If you use your debit card for most purchases, you can use your online bank statement to help you identify your expenses. Don’t forget to account for the cash you spend if you want a true picture of all your expenses.

When setting your budget, you’ll likely have fixed and recurring expenses for housing, transportation, student loans, utilities, and other similar areas. Then, you’ll need to set an amount for variable expenses like groceries, clothing, and entertainment.

Knowing your income each month will help you set goals. If you have a steady job, you probably have a consistent weekly or monthly income and can use that to start your budget. Your monthly expenses should be less than your available income each month.

If this is not the case, you can review your expenses to identify areas to trim back and reduce your spending each month. Once you’ve created a budget, try to stick to it as best you can each month. That way, you’ll stay on track and not get into a position of having to use credit cards or possibly getting behind on some of your bills.

Save, Save, Save—The Sooner You Start the Better

Even if you’re in your 20’s, it’s never too early to include retirement in your budget planning. If you start with small contributions, you can make it a habit and priority. If your employer offers a 401(k) plan and matches your contributions, take full advantage of the opportunity for free money.

It’s also important to set aside funds for unexpected expenses or emergencies. A good rule of thumb is to have three to six months of income in a savings account that you can access for those unplanned events. Not only will this give you peace of mind knowing that you have your own safety net, but it will help you avoid putting large charges on a credit card that will likely incur high interest fees.

Pay Down High Interest Rate Debt

Whether you’re paying off a student loan, a car, or a credit card balance, it’s always an accomplishment to know you have extra income to go toward something else (like saving).

If you can allocate some extra resources to pay down your debt, it’s generally best to start by tackling the account with the highest interest rate. That might be a credit card balance that seems like it never gets smaller because of the interest that keeps adding up each month.

Another goal you might have is to simply pay something off with a smaller balance just to get that sense of accomplishment and then move that money toward paying down other debt. It might make sense to look at debt consolidation or refinancing where you may benefit from paying off higher rate loans or debt with a lower interest rate personal loan. This is especially helpful with high rate credit cards. See our article on using personal loans to cure those post-holiday credit card blues. You can find other helpful articles and resources at U-fi.com. All of us at U-fi wish you a successful and prosperous new year!

Have you ever applied for a loan from a bank and wondered why you received a certain interest rate? I remember when I applied for a loan to buy my first house. I’d taken out a few student loans that I paid off, but I was still making payments on my auto loan, and had a couple of open credit cards. Since I’d never had a late payment, I assumed I would qualify for the lowest advertised interest rate. I had no idea what my credit score was.

After submitting my loan application, to my surprise, I wasn’t offered the lowest rate. “But why?” I asked the mortgage loan officer. I had never missed a payment on any of my loans or credit cards. Isn’t that what they should be concerned about? They told me my credit score wasn’t high enough to warrant their lowest rate.

After some research, I discovered the quality of the applicant’s credit score is one of the most important factors lenders consider when deciding to whether to extend credit. It’s also taken into account when deciding what terms and rates are offered. And, that a person’s credit report determines the person’s credit score.

What is a credit score?

A credit score is a numerical representation of your credit risk. That essentially means how likely you are to pay back the loan. Credit scores range from 300 to 850, and are used by lenders to easily and objectively evaluate your credit risk. Higher scores usually mean less credit risk. Most lenders require a minimum credit score before they offer you a loan. They also create credit score tiers used to determine what interest rate they offer. That’s why you should have as high a credit score as possible before applying for any loan, regardless of type.

What can you do to raise your credit score?

The first thing to know is it takes time to improve your credit score. While you can ruin your credit score very quickly, it can take several years of good behavior to increase it. This is especially true if you have had a credit mishap like a missed payment. Below are six suggestions to help you improve (or maintain) your credit score.

  1. Review your credit report annually. At least once per year, check your credit report for accuracy, and that nothing is on it that shouldn’t be. Reviewing your credit report can also help you protect yourself from identify theft, which could ruin your good credit. If you have any questions about your credit report, or wish to dispute an error, immediately contact the credit reporting agency that issued the report. Tip: You can get one free credit report per year from each of the three major credit reporting agencies simply by visiting www.AnnualCreditReport.com and requesting your free credit report. Unfortunately, you won’t find your credit score on your credit report. Some credit card providers have partnerships with one of the three large credit bureaus to provide free credit scores to their customers. Check to see if your credit card provider has such an arrangement.
  2. Pay your bills on time. This may seem like a no-brainer, but it’s important to make your payments on time, as any late or missed payments are likely reported to the credit bureaus. If you’ve missed a payment, get your account current and stay current. The longer you go without missing a payment, the more your credit score should increase.
  3. Pay down your credit card balances. When your credit cards have high balances, it gives you a high debt-to-credit ratio (also known as utilization rate) and can signal credit providers and lenders that you are facing financial difficulty.Tip: Don’t move your balance from one credit card to another as this won’t help.
  4. Only apply for a new loan or credit card when you truly need one. When you apply for a new credit card, you add a “hard inquiry” to your credit report, which causes your credit score to drop slightly in the short term. You may also be adding more new debt than you can afford to repay, both of which could negatively impact your credit.
  5. Enroll in automatic payments. Enroll in automatic payments through your credit card and loan providers to have payments automatically debited from your bank account. Most student loan providers offer an interest rate discount for automatic payments, so there is that added benefit as well. Tip: When setting up automatic payments on credit cards, if you choose to make only the minimum required payment, you could be rolling over large balances each month and get hit with high interest charges.

How Does It All Help?

Having a clean credit report and a high credit score can help you in many ways, including lowering the cost of borrowing, obtaining insurance, setting up housing utilities, getting a job offer, and more. If you are having trouble making your payments, be sure to speak with your credit card provider or lender before you miss a payment. It’s in their best interest to work with you to find a mutually agreeable solution, so you may be able to work out an arrangement that meets your needs.

If you’re reading this, you probably have at least one credit card already. Credit cards can be a helpful tool when used appropriately, including helping you establish credit and build your credit score. However, you can also damage your credit score if you develop bad habits with your credit cards. Here are some tips to help you avoid going down the wrong path so you can better manage your finances. You can also check out our Credit Card Tips sheet for additional information.

Looking for a New Credit Card?

If you’re in the market for a credit card, there are some important factors to keep in mind. First, do you already have a credit card? If so, why do you need an additional card? Typically, one is all you really need. If you open several new accounts within a short period of time, your credit score could be damaged. You could be perceived as a higher credit risk because you increased your capacity to take on more debt. This might ultimately be hard to repay.

If you’re looking for your first credit card, be sure to compare different offers and find the card that will work best for you. Here are some things to look for in a credit card:

  • Find a card with the lowest interest rate
  • Avoid outrageous fees (make sure you read all the fine print to understand what fees can be charged)
  • Be cautious of low introductory interest rates that can increase greatly after their initial low interest period

Managing Your Existing Credit Cards

Once you have a credit card, it’s best to have a solid game plan in advance. Sticking to your strategy ensures you won’t get in trouble financially and find yourself with an impossibly high balance.

Credit Card Goals

Here are four goals that will help you stay in control of your credit cards:

  1. Try to pay your balance in full each month. Think of your credit card as an extension of your bank account. That way, you won’t be tempted to charge more than you can afford. Just remember not to charge more than you could pay if you had used your debit card.
  2. If you can’t pay your balance in full, try not to carry much of a balance from month to month. Make a goal to pay more than the minimum monthly payment due. This will help you pay down your balance as quickly as possible. Keep in mind the balance you are carrying is also charged interest, which can make that original purchase more expensive.
  3. Don’t be late with any of your payments. Make sure you know your monthly payment due date. Even if you plan to pay the balance in full, it’s important to make that payment on time. You may want to set a reminder for yourself so you won’t miss that date. If you’re late by even one day, your credit card company may charge a higher interest rate and late fees. Additionally, being late on a payment may lower your credit score.
  4. Avoid impulse purchases and cash advances. Just because you have a credit card doesn’t mean you’re obligated to use it. Although it may be tempting to buy something expensive on credit, it’s better to take your time and save for that purchase. Remember that using your credit card to buy something expensive this month means paying for it over several months. And, you’ll end up paying a lot more than that original purchase price with the added interest charges. Finally, don’t use your credit card for cash advances at the ATM. You could be charged a fee, and may also pay a higher rate of interest on that transaction.

Use Credit Responsibly

Remember, credit cards can be a helpful financial tool when used responsibly. Do you currently have a balance with a high interest rate? Are you looking for a smart way to pay off that debt? A personal loan is a solution worth exploring to pay off your high rate credit card balances. You can find more information about personal loan solutions, as well as additional tools and resources at U-fi.com.

Does your January credit card statement have you feeling blue? Find out how personal loans could provide credit relief.

It Happens to the Best of Us

The holidays have come and gone. You may be feeling a bit relieved that all the seasonal hustle and bustle is over. Sure, it may be a bit cold outside. Sure, work is back in full swing. But, things are looking good with your New Year’s resolutions. You’re feeling optimistic and energized.

Then, you receive your January credit card bill. Whoa, the new balance is much higher than you expected. As you go down the list of purchases on your statement you ask yourself, “Did I really spend that much?” You also notice the available credit on your credit card is pretty low. There are some big purchases coming up in your future. You were planning on using your credit card to pay for them. Now, you no longer have enough available credit to pay for everything as planned.

With average credit card APRs over 16%, and many exceeding 20%, you know if you don’t pay your balance in full you’ll be hit with a hefty finance charge, which will be added to your outstanding credit card balance. And even worse, if you’re late making the minimum payment that’s due, you could be hit with a penalty APR, which can be as high as 29.99%.

Personal Loans Could Provide Credit Relief

This is where personal loans could provide credit relief. Unlike a credit card, which is a revolving line of credit, a personal loan is an unsecured loan that doesn’t require any collateral, such as a car or house. Personal loans come with a specific repayment period, usually between 1 and 7 years. Fixed interest rates are more common than variable interest rates, and some lenders will offer you a choice.

The main reason people take out personal loans is to pay off existing debt, such as high interest rate credit cards or loans. Other common reasons include making major purchases, for home improvement projects, for special occasions like weddings, to take a vacation, and to pay off medical bills.

Personal loans can range from as little as $1,000 to as high as $100,000. APRs vary widely among lenders and are based on the borrower’s (or co-signer’s) credit history, annual income, repayment term selected, and type of interest rate chosen. Some personal loans even come with money saving automatic payment discounts and loyalty discounts.

Tip: Some lenders charge upfront fees, which add to the total cost of the loan, so be sure to take that into account before choosing a lender.

A really nice feature for personal loans is how quick and easy the process can be. If you submit a completed loan application, you can receive a decision in a matter of minutes, and if approved, receive funds in your bank account as soon as the next business day, provided your application has no typos or errors.

Now that the holidays are over, you may be suffering from the post-holiday credit card blues. If so, check out a personal loan for credit relief from U-fi’s partner. It just may be what the doctor ordered.

Winter break is often a favorite time of year for college students. It’s a chance to go home, visit family and friends, enjoy home-cooked meals, and maybe do a little holiday shopping. Unfortunately, working off that extra helping of pumpkin pie may be easier than off your holiday spending.

5 Holiday Spending Tips

As you prepare to enjoy the holidays, these tips can help you avoid spending traps. Here’s how you can ring in the New Year without a mountain of debt and  holiday spending regret.

  1. Don’t use student loans to pay for a holiday trip or gifts.

    Using a student loan to finance a trip over the holiday break or a shopping spree might be tempting. But remember, your student loan is intended for educational expenses. Plus, you really don’t want to take on student loan debt for a short term benefit that you’ll be paying back for 10-plus years with interest.

  2. Avoid paying for everything with a credit card.

    Much like using a student loan, you’re better off to simply pay with cash and avoid using a credit card for holiday expenses. Credit cards will typically have high interest rates, especially if you carry a balance. If you can’t pay cash for your holiday purchases, it’s probably not worth the cost.

  3. Don’t feel obligated to buy gifts for all your friends and family.

    If you’re a student, your friends and family understand that you’re on a tight budget and may not have the resources to buy gifts for everyone. Simply spending some time with friends and family will likely be more meaningful than any gift you could purchase at the mall. Find ways to do small but meaningful things that will be appreciated.

  4. Don’t forget to set a budget or spending limit.

    It’s important to know in advance what you can reasonably afford to spend. It’s a good idea to set a budget for yourself and cap your spending at a certain dollar amount. That will help keep you on track and also let you plan better for the people on your gift list, and possibly help you cut back on the number of people on your list. Some families draw names for gifts or find other creative ways to help family members keep their expenses down and enjoy their time together.

  5. Avoid paying for gift wrapping or expensive gift bags and cards.

    It’s convenient to drop your gifts off and have someone else wrap them. However, there’s a cost for convenience and it simply might not be worth paying for. Buying wrapping paper after the holidays is a great way to save money and plan ahead for the next year. Plus, if you plan and don’t make all your gift purchases at once, you won’t be bogged down wrapping a lot of gifts at the last minute. Often, a card and a gift bag may actually cost more than the gift you’re giving.

With a little discipline and planning, you can set yourself up for a fun-filled holiday season without incurring the stress of spending too much or putting yourself into debt. Remember to enjoy the holidays and the time spent with friends and family. Many times, the best gifts are the ones that don’t cost anything at all.

You’re in college and on your own, but you may still experience the occasional financial pitfall. Below are money mistakes many students make, and some tips on how to avoid them.

Financial Pitfall #1: Spending all your living expense money early in the semester.

You’ve probably set aside spending money for personal expenses if you live off campus. Or, you may have financial aid funds to use for room, board, or other educational expenses. That money needs to last through the entire semester, but many students spend it within the first few months. How can you avoid spending your money too early? Use these financial management tips and this budget worksheet to help develop a monthly spending plan.

Financial Pitfall #2: Not taking advantage of part-time employment opportunities.

Most schools offer part-time employment options for students through Federal Work-Study, and by posting on- and off-campus jobs. You might worry that a job will conflict with academic work, but studies show that students who work between 15 and 20 hours while in school are generally more confident and successful. Having a job helps bring in money regularly throughout the semester and can help build your resume. Your college financial aid office awards Federal Work-Study and generally posts related job opportunities. Work-Study is based on financial need and requires a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) . Other part-time jobs may be posted by the Career Office, Student Affairs, or other places on campus. Check your school website for more information.

Financial Pitfall #3: Accumulating credit card debt.

You’ve probably already received credit card offers in the mail. You may also notice giveaways and travel rewards that make the offers sound appealing. Be careful – as a new credit card holder, your interest rates will be high, and credit card offers tend to have many fees attached. Be sure to read the fine print and note that the initial low interest rate offered may expire in just a few months. You can quickly accumulate credit card balances that can swell out of control, especially if you’re only making minimum payments. Here’s an overview of credit card pros and cons, along with additional information about other matters to consider.

Financial Pitfall #4: Taking out student loans without understanding them.

Student loans are so common that students often see them as just another type of financial aid. There is an important difference; student loans must be paid back. While student loans can be a useful way to pay for your education, keep your borrowing to a minimum. Know what your monthly loan payment will be when you get out of school. Understand what you can realistically afford to borrow. It is also important to know the types of loans, the terms of those loans, and the options available. To get a general idea of what your monthly loan payment may be when you finish school, Federal Student Aid provides an easy-to-use repayment calculator.

The earlier you can learn the basics about managing your finances, the better off you’ll be in the long run. These simple steps should help you build the foundation you need for a successful financial future.

If you borrowed student loans to help pay for college, you may not be required to make any payments until after you graduate or drop below half-time enrollment. That sounds like a pretty good deal; no payments and no worries while you focus on your studies. But remember, if you take out a federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan, a federal Direct PLUS Loan, or a private loan, interest accumulates during those months (or years) you’re in school and not making any payments. Here are some ways you can save on your student loans while you’re still in school.

Accruing Interest

Interest that accrues on your student loan will typically be capitalized when you begin repayment. That means any accrued interest during those months you are not making payments is added to the original principal amount of your loan. For instance, if you borrowed a $15,000 student loan with an interest rate of 6% as a freshman and made no payments for the four years you were in school, plus your grace period, 51 months would have passed. In this scenario, when you begin your repayment period, you would actually have a balance of $18,825 when you start repaying your loan 51 months later. That’s because $3,825 in interest (also known as capitalized interest) would have accrued during those 51 months and was added to your original loan amount.

In-School Payments Can Help

Now, let’s say you have a part-time job while you’re in school, working 15-20 hours a week to help with some of your expenses. If you could simply pay around $75 a month toward that $15,000 student loan, you could actually pay all the accruing interest (remember, that’s $3,825 total that would have been added to your loan when your first scheduled monthly payment is due). If you’re able to pay $75 towards your student loan’s accruing interest, the total cost you could ultimately save over the life of a 10-year repayment period would be nearly $1,300.

Example

Paying Interest While In School (No Capitalized Interest)Fully Deferred Payments While In School – No Payments (Capitalized Interest)
Original Loan Amount$15,000$15,000
Interest Accrued During In School and Grace Period (51 months)$3,825$3,825
Interest Paid During In-School and Grace Period$3,825$0
Loan Amount When Entering Repayment$15,000$18,825
Number of Months of Repayment120120
Monthly Payment$166.53$209
Total Interest Paid on Loan (including any payments during in school and grace period)$8,808.60$10,080
Total Paid on Student Loan (original loan amount plus interest)$23,808.60$25,080

As you can see from this example, making interest payments while you’re in school and during your grace period can help you save on your student loans down the road. Plus, making payments during your in-school and grace period also gets you in the habit of making payments on your student loan and better prepares you for successful repayment. Remember, this is just an example of borrowing one loan during your freshman year of college. Imagine what the capitalized interest could look like if you borrow each year of college, or what your savings would be by making continued interest payments while you’re in school. You can learn more ways to save on your student loans and get additional helpful information by visiting our student loan resources.

Whether entering college after high school or transitioning from full-time employment, your financial picture will change as a student. The summer is a good time to prepare for that change. College may be the first time you manage finances on your own. Or, you may be cutting back on your work hours and living on a lower income while attending school. Either way, these six tips for understanding education costs can help you develop a financial plan for the months ahead.

Create a Budget

Maybe you’re coming to school with money you’ve saved for personal expenses. Perhaps you have a family-provided bank account. Maybe you have financial aid designated for living costs. Either way, you probably have a lump sum which needs to last throughout the term. Establishing a budget that considers your available funds and expenses helps stretch that money instead of spending it upfront. Budgets take self-discipline and planning, but they are well worth the effort. They can play a big part in understanding education costs. Use this helpful budget worksheet to get started.

Don’t Borrow More Than You Need

Student loans come primarily from federal or private sources. After federal loan funds are exhausted, some students turn to private student loans to help cover expenses. Student loans provide money to help with college costs. But, you need to repay those funds with interest after you leave school. It’s sometimes easy for students to develop an, “I’ll worry about that tomorrow” attitude about borrowing. They often take out more than they need. While they are a good investment in your education, loans can add up. They can become a large financial commitment for years after you leave school. This is especially true if you start using student loans for living expenses. Our advice: only borrow what you need for college bills.

Work Part-Time While You’re in School

A big part of understanding education costs is realizing what you need. Getting a part-time job can bring money in on a regular basis while you’re in school. It can also keep you from using student loans or credit cards to cover personal expenses. There are two different types of jobs: Federal Work-Study, which would have been included on your financial aid award letter, or a part-time job that you obtain on your own. Colleges often have job boards that identify positions as one or the other. You can also look on local job websites for part-time employment. Businesses in college towns often rely on students as a part-time workforce. Concerned about work conflicting with your coursework? Studies show students who work less than 20 hours a week actually do better academically. They are also more likely to graduate.

Be Careful with Credit Cards

College students often receive credit card offers in the mail, online, and at concerts and events. Those free t-shirts and travel mile offers entice new banking customers, but they may not be worth it. While wise use of credit is a move toward financial independence, overuse of credit can cause financial pressure. It can compete with your academic and financial goals. Read the small print, take out the best rate with the lowest fees, and use credit sparingly, if at all. If you do decide to take out a credit card, the best way to use credit is to pay it off completely every month. That way, you can develop a positive credit history, but not accrue interest and fees that can take years to repay.

Understand Your Financial Aid

Students who go directly to college from high school often rely on parents to complete financial aid forms, review financial aid, and pay college bills. However, understanding education costs is an important part of knowing you are responsible for keeping that financial aid. You must make Satisfactory Academic Progress, get a job, if eligible, for Federal Work-Study, and repay the loan you have taken out. When you are in school, the financial aid office will reach out to you to take action or answer questions about your financial aid. It’s important for you to understand your financial aid and the corresponding responsibilities.

Protect Your Personal Information

As a student, you may be a primary target of identity theft. Students tend to be more trusting, have new and unblemished credit, and are unfamiliar with the ways their information can be compromised. Be sure to protect personal information like your Social Security number, date of birth, driver’s license number, bank account numbers, PIN numbers, and other related information. Avoid shopping online on public computers and keep personal documents and information in highly secure places. More helpful tips are located in this How to Avoid Identity Theft fact sheet.

Although your income will be lower when you are a college student, you’re certainly not alone. Your classmates are in the same situation, struggling with understanding education costs. As a general rule, think of the long run instead of just current wants or needs when making financial decisions. If you make smart financial decisions while attending school, you can use your college years to form a strong foundation for the future, both academically and financially.

If you’re getting your first student loan or credit card, you’re likely seeing some terms you don’t recognize. A key component of being an informed consumer is understanding all those financial terms. You’ve probably heard an announcer at the end of a TV commercial speed-reading through a bunch of legal terms. We’re going to slow it down and lay out the most important terms you need to know.

Accrue

This is the act of interest accumulating on your principle balance.

Annual Percentage Rate (APR)

APR is a more accurate reflection of the total annual loan cost. It includes the actual interest rate, plus any other incurred charges or fees (such as upfront origination fees). You can find more information about interest rates and APRs on our website.

Capitalization

Capitalization means adding unpaid accrued interest to the principal balance of a loan. This increases the amount of your monthly payments and the total amount repaid over the life of the loan. You can choose to pay the interest as it accrues to reduce or completely avoid the cost of capitalization. The more frequently interest capitalizes, the more you wind up paying.

Cosigner

A cosigner or co-borrower is an individual who signs the loan promissory note with you. They are equally responsible for repaying the debt. Having a cosigner can often help you qualify for a better interest rate. This is especially true if you don’t have established credit or sufficient income. This article further outlines the potential benefits of having a cosigner.

Compound Interest

Compound interest is interest calculated on the principal loan amount, plus any interest accrued during previous periods. For example, if interest is compounded monthly, you would then pay interest on the interest that accrued in the previous month, as well as the outstanding principal. Compound interest can drive up your total cost of paying off debt.

Credit Bureau

A credit bureau is an agency that collects personal and financial information from various sources about consumers. The agency retains information about the types and amounts of credit you have obtained as well as your timeliness in making payments. Your credit card companies and the various lenders which have made loans to you report this information to the agency.

Credit Score

A credit score is a number, generally between 300 and 850, provided in a credit report and used by a lender as a predictive indicator of your likelihood to repay a loan. The credit score may be used by the lender to determine eligibility and set the terms of a loan, such as the interest rate and fees. The higher the credit score, the better. Higher scores will generally allow you to receive better interest rates. Check out our article on understanding your credit report for more detailed information.

Default

The failure of a borrower to repay a loan according to the terms of the promissory note is a default. For federal student loans, default occurs at 270 days delinquent and has a negative effect on your credit score.

Delinquency

Failure to make payments when they are due is referred to as delinquency. Delinquency begins with the first missed payment. Missed payments or delinquent payments will negatively impact your credit score, so make sure you stay current on all payments.

Finance Charge

The total amount of interest that will be paid over the life of a loan when the loan is repaid according to the payment schedule is the finance charge.

Fixed Interest Rate

A fixed interest rate is an interest rate that remains the same for the duration of the loan or credit obligation.

Interest

This is an amount, calculated as a percentage of the principal loan amount, that lenders charge for borrowed money.

Interest Rate

The interest rate is the rate at which interest is calculated on your loans or credit card balance.

Minimum Monthly Payment

The smallest monthly payment amount that can be made in order for a loan account to remain in a current repayment status is the minimum monthly payment. For a credit card bill, you’ll find that paying more than the minimum monthly payment will help you pay your balance faster and likely help you avoid potential rate increases on your credit card.

Origination Fee

The fee you pay and deduct from the principal of a loan prior to disbursement is the origination fee. For federal loans, you pay this fee to the federal government to offset the cost of your interest subsidy. For private loan programs, you pay the origination fee to the lender to cover the cost of administering and insuring the program.

Promissory Note

The promissory note is the binding legal document you sign for a loan, which lists the terms and conditions of the loan as well as your rights and responsibilities. For federal student loans, another name for the promissory note is the Master Promissory Note (MPN).

Simple Interest

Simple interest is interest only calculated based on the principal amount of the loan.

Truth in Lending Disclosure

This disclosure is a statement lenders provide to you prior to or at the time of disbursement of a private loan that lists the lender name and contact information, amount financed, annual percentage rate (APR), finance charge, payment amount and schedule, and total repayment amount.

Variable Interest Rate

The rate of interest charged on a loan changes periodically (monthly, quarterly, or annually) and fluctuates with a stated base index (such as the Prime Rate or a LIBOR index) is a variable interest rate. The variable interest rate fluctuates as the base index changes. So, your monthly payment amounts will increase or decrease depending on if interest rates rise or fall.

Now you have a basic understanding of some of the common financial terms and how they impact you as a consumer. Remember, always make sure that you understand all of the terms and conditions when you take out student loans, open a new credit card account, or take on a new loan of any kind. Reputable companies will be happy to answer any questions you have so that you have a clear understanding of your financial obligations.