Feefo logo

interest

Have you decided to go to graduate school? You may be researching how to pay for tuition and other expenses. You have another decision to make as well – what to do about any undergraduate student loan debt you may have.

If you attend graduate school at least half-time, your loans can be deferred. That means you don’t have to make payments. Although that will provide immediate relief, there are other long-term financial implications to consider. It’s important to look at the kind of undergraduate loans you have before determining how to proceed.

What are the different types of education loans and their in-school interest rate charges?

Federal Subsidized Loans – With these loans, the federal government pays the interest while you are in school at least half-time. An in-school deferment on subsidized loans means you won’t move into repayment until you leave school.

Federal Unsubsidized Loans – Some or all of your federal undergraduate student loan may be unsubsidized, which basically means that you are responsible for the interest, even while in school. You can still defer your payments if you attend at least half-time. But, the interest continues to build, and is capitalized at repayment. Capitalization is unpaid interest that your lender adds to the principal balance of a loan. Future interest then accrues on the larger balance. That can add up.

Private Loans – These loans are taken out from banks, credit bureaus, and other lending organizations. You can generally defer private loan payments while in school at least half-time. However, interest accrues and capitalizes at repayment as well. More information about private loans is located in U-fi From Nelnet’s Frequently Asked Questions.

Tip: Paying any of the interest on private loans or unsubsidized loans each month while in graduate school can help. It can amount to significant savings in the long run.

How do I find out about my undergraduate student loan and my in-school options?

You can go to the National Student Loan Database (NSLDS) to obtain information about your federal undergraduate student loan. There, you will see the types of loans you have and the terms of each. You can also see the federal loan servicer(s) to whom your loans have been assigned. To find out about your private loans and servicers, check with your lender. Federal and private loan servicers work with you during school. They are also responsible for billing, collection, and information services provided throughout your undergraduate student loan repayment period.

You may wonder how servicers will know that you are in school and eligible for deferment. Your federal servicer(s) receive notification of your in-school status. This happens when your school reports enrollment information as part of their regular administrative procedures. Federal servicers automatically place you in deferment status and notify you. Make sure your private loan servicers know you are in school. Contact them and submit any required information, if needed.

Tip: Your servicers can advise you about the best in-school payment options. For example, working at a non-profit organization or at certain income levels may put you on a different repayment track for federal loans. It’s wise to take advantage of your servicers’ individualized counseling before making any decisions about how to handle your loans before, during, or after graduate school.

Do I have other loan management options for my private loans?

If you took out private loans as an undergraduate, you may want to explore whether refinancing your loans into one new private loan is a viable option before entering graduate school. If your undergraduate private loans have higher interest rates than those currently available, or if you would like to combine multiple loans into one loan, refinancing may be a good choice for you. Private refinance loans are based on credit and you may need a cosigner to get the best rate. Refinance loans usually offer in-school deferment options if you attend school at least half-time. Interest accrues and will be capitalized at repayment.

Be cautious about including federal loans in a refinance loan. Even if the rate is lower, you will lose loan forgiveness, income-driven repayment options, and some other features available only in federal programs.

What about the loans I’ll take out while in grad school?

Since subsidized federal loans are not available to graduate students, interest accrues on both federal and private loans while you’re in school. If you are unable to make interest payments on all of your loans while in graduate school, consider paying interest on the highest rate loan(s) first. Any progress you can make on paying interest will put you in a better position when you move into loan repayment.

Talking with your federal and private loans servicers can help you determine the best options in your specific situation. Education loan management can seem complicated. Your servicers can look at your accounts and provide information about the best choices for you.

Ever taken out or refinanced your student loans? You probably know the interest rate of your loan, and may have seen the letters APR on your statement. (APR stands for Annual Percentage Rate.) Understanding the difference between the interest rate and the APR is important. While they both measure the cost of borrowing money, they are not the same. Knowing the difference could save you thousands of dollars on your student loans.

What is the difference between the student loan interest rate and the APR?

The interest rate on a student loan is the cost to borrow money. It is shown as a percentage. Your interest rate does not reflect any fees or other charges you may pay for the loan. The APR goes a step further. It takes the interest rate on a student loan and adds in any upfront costs, such as an origination fee. The APR is also a percentage, but it measures the total cost of borrowing money on an annual basis.

By law, private student loan issuers must show customers the APR. The law requires this to facilitate a clear understanding of the actual interest rates and fees applicable to their agreements. In the U.S., the calculation and disclosure of APR is governed by the Truth in Lending Act.

Tip: While U-fi From Nelnet and many private student loan lenders do not charge an origination fee, some lenders do. Be sure to carefully read the loan terms before applying for and accepting a loan.

Why is it important to know the APR if I know the student loan interest rate?

As mentioned above, the APR gives a more complete picture of the cost of borrowing. For student loans and student loan refinancing, if the lender doesn’t charge an origination fee and you immediately begin making full principal and interest payments, the interest rate and the APR will likely be the same. However, if the lender charges an origination fee or you defer making principal and/or interest payments while you are in school, your APR will not likely be the same as your interest rate. By looking at both the interest rate and the APR, you will be able to get a clearer picture of your expected monthly payment and the total cost of the loan.

Does the interest rate and APR tell the complete story?

Interest rates and the APRs are useful tools to help understand the cost of borrowing and to compare different loans. But, they don’t always tell the complete story. For instance, federal Direct Subsidized Loans, Direct Unsubsidized Loans, and Direct PLUS Loans come with an origination fee, but the fee is deducted from the loan disbursements, so the origination fee is not included in the APR. Thus, if you took out a $10,000 federal Direct PLUS Loan with its 4.272% origination fee, you would only receive $9,572.80, but you would have to pay back the entire $10,000, plus any accrued interest on the loan.

Also, the stated APR may or may not include any borrower benefits associated with the loan, such as an interest rate reduction for auto debit payments or cash back rewards for good grades. Some federal student loans also come with loan forgiveness programs, so be sure to take all these into account when comparing loan offers.

Tip: The interest rate and the APR for a variable rate student loan reflects the interest rate and costs at the time you take out the loan. If interest rates change, the APR changes as well.

Knowing the difference between APR and interest rate helps you make an informed decision when taking out student loans.

Considering paying off your student loan debt with your tax return or just a lump sum of money? There can be more to larger payments than meets the eye. Follow these steps to learn how to make the most of your lump sum payment.

1. Make a List

Knowing which loans you want to pay off first will help you get the most bang for your buck. Make a list of all of your federal and private student loans, the balances, and the interest rates. Then, based on your goals, weigh your options. You could put your lump sum payment toward your highest interest rate loans, or pay off your low-balance loans first. Paying off your highest interest rate loans reduces the amount of interest you pay. It also saves you money over the life of the loan. Paying off your lowest balance loans first could save you money on your monthly payment. Paying off your lower-balance loans allows you to put money saved from a lower payment toward your other student loans. This can help you to pay them off faster.

2. Talk to Your Loan Servicer

Check to make sure your loan servicer knows how you want your payments applied to your student loans. If you pay above the minimum payment and don’t specify how you want payments applied, your loan servicer decides for you.

Below is a sample letter put together by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) that you can send to your loan servicer to ensure payments above your minimum monthly payment amount are being applied to the correct loan(s). For some loan servicers, this can be done online.

I am writing to provide you instructions on how to apply excess payments greater than the minimum amount due. Please apply payments as follows:

  1. After applying the minimum amount due for each loan, apply any additional amount to the loan accruing the highest interest rate.
  2. If there are multiple loans with the same interest rate, please apply the additional amount to the loan with the lowest outstanding principal balance.
  3. If any additional amount above the minimum amount due ends up paying off an individual loan, please then apply any remaining part of my payment to the loan with the next highest interest rate.

It is possible that I may find an option to refinance my loans to a lower rate with another lender. If this lender or any third party makes payments to my account on my behalf, use the instructions outlined above.

Retain these instructions. Please apply these instructions to all future overpayments. Please confirm these payments will be processed as specified. Otherwise, please provide an explanation as to why you are unable to follow these instructions.

3. Things to Keep In Mind

There are a few other things to be mindful of once you’ve decided where to apply your lump sum payment.

  1. Follow up with your loan servicer. Call or check your accounts online to make sure your payment was applied as specified.
  2. Making a payment larger than your minimum payment amount can sometimes advance your due date. This means another payment on your student loans won’t be due until your minimum payments catch up to your lump sum payment. While it can be nice to skip a few months of student loan payments, your loans still accrue interest and won’t save you any money. Even if your due date advances, continue to make your monthly payments to save yourself money in the long run.
  3. You can also save money on your student loans by refinancing. Refinancing allows you to combine both your federal and private student loans into a new loan with a new repayment term and interest rate, which can often save money over the life of the loan, or help lower your monthly payment.

Paying off your student loans is a great accomplishment. As you begin to make decisions around your personal finances, make sure to keep these tips in mind so that you can make the best choices for your financial future.