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Private Loans

You may have heard about private student loans. Some information about private loans is like a Bigfoot sighting. There are a lot of stories, but they often aren’t based on facts. In this article, we’ll look at each private loan myth and give you the facts.

Private Loan Myth #1: Private Student Loans Only Offer Variable Interest Rates

One of the most common myths about private student loans is that they’re only available with riskier variable interest rates. In reality, most private loan providers offer borrowers a choice between a fixed interest rate and a variable interest rate. Depending on your individual circumstances, one may be more appealing than the other. Read more about choosing a variable or fixed interest rate to see what important factors should be considered when choosing your type of interest rate. Additionally, highly qualified borrowers can likely find private student loans with low interest rate options.

Private Loan Myth #2: Private Student Loans Have High Origination or Application Fees

The reality is that most private loan providers currently charge NO upfront fees, also known as origination or application fees. There is no fee to make extra payments or to pay off loans early. Although most loan providers offer loans with no upfront fees, research your options. Be sure to verify any fees or charges associated with loan products.

Private Loan Myth #3: Private Student Loans Require Immediate Repayment While You are Still in School

As a borrower, you have various repayment options offered by different private loan providers. Most lenders have an option to delay or postpone payments while enrolled at least half-time. They also offer a six-month grace period following your graduation or last date of at least half-time enrollment. This gives you the option to not make payments while enrolled in school as long as you are enrolled on at least a half-time basis. This can give you some added flexibility while you are focused on your studies. However, if you can make payments in school, even if only the accruing interest, you can save money and keep your loan costs lower. You can find additional ways to save money on your student loans here.

Private Loan Myth #4: Private Student Loans Have No Deferment or Forbearance Options if You Have Difficulty Making Payments

Most lenders offer options to postpone payments if you encounter some type of financial hardship. (You may want to check to be sure.) Most private loan lenders provide a hardship forbearance to temporarily postpone payments if you find it difficult to make payments.

Many private loan lenders also offer deferments. Deferments can postpone payments for certain circumstances. These circumstances include returning to school, having an internship or residency, or during other approved events. Again, check with your private loan lenders to see what options are specifically available.

Private Loan Myth #5: Federal Student Loans are Always Cheaper than Private Student Loans

As a general rule, explore your federal student loan options first before taking out any private loans. Federal student loans will typically provide you a greater degree of flexibility with repayment options and various forgiveness provisions. You can read a good overview of federal and private student loans here.

However, many private student loans can have interest rates as low as or even lower than federal student loans. Federal student loans also have a nominal origination fee charged to borrowers. As discussed earlier, most private loans do not have any origination or application fees. Several lenders now offer private loans designed specifically for parents for their students’ educational expenses. Parents find these loan options often have lower interest rates compared to federal Parent PLUS loans.

We hope you have a better understanding of private student loans and are better equipped to make informed decisions regarding your education financing options. Research your options to find what works best for your individual circumstances and don’t believe every myth you hear. But, if you happen to see Bigfoot in the cafeteria on campus, snap a pic. You just might be able to sell it and pay off your student loans!

You’ve made your decision. You are going to refinance your student loans. You have done the research. You’ve compared a number of student loan refinance programs. You have completed side-by-side calculations. You know which ones have the lowest interest rates, best repayment options, and the most generous borrower benefit programs. You’ve read the fine print and narrowed your choices down to your top three. But do you know your loan servicer?

Making the Choice

So which one is it going to be? Is it the lender who lists the lowest interest rate? Or perhaps the lender with the repayment plan that allows you to lower your monthly payment the most? How about the lender that offers those tantalizing borrower benefits? The ones that allow you to save hundreds of dollars more when you refinance with them?

Choosing which student loan lender to refinance with can be a difficult decision. While you should definitely consider the overall cost, monthly payment, and borrower benefits offered, there is another very important factor. You need to know who the lender and loan servicer will be after making your new refinance loan; the one you will start making your new monthly payments to.

Who are Loan Servicers?

You may be wondering why this is important. Once you refinance your student loans, many lenders have agreements to sell, or package their loans into financial securities. Thes often go to the highest bidder. The proceeds from the sale then make more refinance loans, which the lender subsequently sells. This happens over and over again. Rinse and repeat.

Lenders Decide

Ok, so the lender sells their loans, but the loan servicer the lender contracts with to manage your account and accept payments has a good reputation, which means you’re good to go, right? Maybe. That’s because the holder of your student loans (either the original lender or the buyer if the loans are sold) gets to decide where the loans are serviced. And once your refinance loan is made, the loan servicer is most important to you, since this is who you will be interacting with. It’s similar to when you buy a TV from a large retailer. The retailer sets the price and sells you the TV, but once you own it, you must contact the manufacturer with any questions or if you need customer support.

Tip: The lender and loan servicer information can usually be found on the lender’s website, in the Application and Solicitation Disclosure every lender is required to present you before you apply for a loan, or on the actual promissory note you must sign. If you don’t recognize the lender or loan servicer, you should call the financial aid office at your school to ask them if they are a reputable organization.

What if the lender doesn’t sell their loans, or package them into financial securities. Everything is fine then, right? If the lender doesn’t sell their loans, or sells them to a buyer that uses the same loan servicer, then you can feel pretty good about things. While there are no guarantees, if the lender uses a reputable loan servicer, then you can feel fairly confident your customer satisfaction is very important to them. The chances that they would jeopardize this by cutting corners with a low-cost, low-quality servicer just to save a few dollars is less likely.

Know Your Lender and Servicer

Knowing who the holder and loan servicer of refinanced student loans are after the loan is made is extremely important. If the lender sells their loans, be sure you know who the buyer is and which loan servicer they use. If you’ve ever had to deal with a company that provides poor customer service, chances are you wouldn’t buy from them again if you didn’t have to. With student loan refinancing it’s even more important, because if you’re unhappy with your loan servicer, the only way to switch is to refinance your loans again.

If you have received your financial aid award and still need money for college, private loans may be worth considering. Banks, credit unions, and other lending organizations offer private loans.

First Steps for Private Loans

You take out private loans in your own name. They often require you to apply with a qualified cosigner who has an established credit history. Even if you don’t need a cosigner, using one may still help you obtain a better interest rate. Lenders provide the best rates to borrowers and cosigners with the strongest credit qualifications.

As a general rule, private loans should be the last financial aid option. Always file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) first, and accept any grants, scholarships, work-study and federal loans offered by your school before taking out a private loan. Federal loans offer more repayment options, income-based programs, and in some cases, loan forgiveness alternatives.

If you decide a private loan is right for you, consider these things when selecting a program.

1. Check to see if your college has a recommended lender list.

Some schools investigate private loan programs and providers on behalf of their students. They provide lists of those they think would best meet their students’ needs. If your school has a list, you can begin there. Your school generally posts school lender lists on their financial aid website. In many cases, the website links you to a third party where your school provided a list of programs. In either case, loan programs are usually listed by feature, so you can compare to see which might best meet your needs. If your school does not have a lender list, you can investigate Credible or other websites which will provide loan program options and help you compare features.

2. Decide which features are the most important to you.

  • Rates – In comparing interest rates, you will see some lenders use an index called London Interbank Offered Rates (LIBOR), and others use the Prime Rate index. Since they aren’t the same, look at the loan programs’ Annual Percentage Rates (APRs). The lowest and highest APR ranges are be displayed. If APRs aren’t listed, be aware that the Prime Rate is typically two to three points higher than LIBOR. The most current rates can be located in the Federal Reserve’s Statistical Release.
  • Fees – Most private loan lenders offer zero application and origination fees. Check all loan programs you are considering to make sure this is true and to determine if there are other fees associated with the loan.
  • Repayment plans and terms – Would you prefer in-school interest payments to keep your costs down? Perhaps multiple repayment period choices like a 5, 10, or a 15 year period are best for you. With private loans, you choose your repayment period at the time you take out your loan. You may also want to check to see if there are deferment or forbearance options if you run into difficulty in repayment.
  • Cosigner release – Your cosigner is responsible for making payments if you do not. The cosigner’s credit report reflects any late or missed payments as well. When investigating options, determine if the program offers a cosigner release, how many payments you will need to make before that is possible, and how involved the release process is.
  • Borrower benefits – Lenders offer a variety of benefits like interest discounts for auto-debit payments, cash back for achieving certain grades, or interest reductions after a specific number of on-time payments. Be sure you determine which are the most important to you and take the required action to meet the requirements.

3. Understand the difference between fixed and variable rates.

As you compare differences between programs, interest rates may be a primary factor. You will need to decide between fixed rates, which may be higher at first but remain the same throughout the life of your loan, or variable rates which may be lower at first but change periodically based on fluctuations in the economy. For more information about the factors to consider before making this decision, go to U-fi From Nelnet’s frequently asked questions.

4. Your rate is the one that matters most.

Lenders may advertise low rates when they share their program’s interest ranges, and many students assume they will receive the lowest rates. See if lenders allow you to use a calculator. If you can enter general information about you and your cosigner, you may be able to obtain a preview of what your interest rate will be before completing the application process and providing authorization for your credit to be pulled.

Private loans can provide a solid financial option for students who need help bridging the gap between financial aid and college costs. Be sure to first research programs fully and understand your responsibilities before taking out any type of education loan. If you have questions, your college financial aid office is the best source of information and guidance about your individual situation.

Most students need to borrow money to cover the cost of their college education. It’s important to understand the borrowing options available. If you completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and received an award letter from your college financial aid office, you’ll likely have the option to borrow through the federal loan program called the Direct Loan Program, or simply known as Direct Loans. In the Direct Loan Program, you can borrow through the Direct Subsidized Loan or the Direct Unsubsidized Loan programs. Graduate students and parents of dependent students can also borrow in the Direct PLUS Loan program. These are all federal loan programs as opposed to private, and are generally your first option.

Direct Loans

If you’re an undergraduate student, you’ll want to explore Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans first. A subsidized loan simply means that you do not incur any interest charges while you’re in school. You can receive a Direct Subsidized Loan if you have financial need as determined by the results of your FAFSA. A Direct Unsubsidized Loan may also be available to you. As you might guess, the unsubsidized loan means that you are responsible for interest that accrues on the loan while you are in school.

Private Loans

After you’ve exhausted your federal loan options, you may still have outstanding expenses at your college. That’s when you might seek additional funding options in the form of a private loan. While your college financial aid office will instruct you on how to apply for federal loans, you’ll need to determine which private loan lender you want to use. Some schools may provide you with a list of private loan providers for you to evaluate and select. Other schools may simply direct you to find a private loan provider on your own.

Federal vs. Private

A few years ago, there were significant differences in federal loans and private loans. Now, the programs have many similarities and offer unique benefits. The chart below outlines some key factors in the federal and private loan programs.

Ufi-Loan-Type-Comparison

As you can see from the chart, there are a lot of similarities in both programs. Trying to decide between the two? Here are some important factors to consider:

  • If you’re an undergraduate student, in most cases you will have a more favorable interest rate and loan terms with a federal loan. If you think you’ll be entering any type of career that might qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness, you will want to stay with federal loans when possible. Private loans do not typically offer any type of forgiveness for public service.
  • Federal loans typically provide a greater array of repayment options, including income-driven repayment plans. Most private loan providers do not offer repayment plans tied to your income.
  • If you can afford to make a higher monthly payment over a shorter repayment period, you may find a lower interest rate with a private loan.
  • Many borrowers, especially undergraduate students, find it necessary to use a cosigner for their private student loans. Learn more about the benefits of having a cosigners here.

Complete the FAFSA

Regardless of what type of funding you’re considering, you will generally still want to complete the FAFSA to take advantage of all the financial aid opportunities available to you before borrowing any type of loan. Check out your federal loan options first and then turn to private loans only when necessary to cover additional school costs. Do your research to get a full understanding to know your options and be an informed consumer. If you do consider private loan options, not all private loans or lenders are the same. You may find significant differences between private loan providers, so find one that best fits your needs and circumstances.

Have you decided to go to graduate school? You may be researching how to pay for tuition and other expenses. You have another decision to make as well – what to do about any undergraduate student loan debt you may have.

If you attend graduate school at least half-time, your loans can be deferred. That means you don’t have to make payments. Although that will provide immediate relief, there are other long-term financial implications to consider. It’s important to look at the kind of undergraduate loans you have before determining how to proceed.

What are the different types of education loans and their in-school interest rate charges?

Federal Subsidized Loans – With these loans, the federal government pays the interest while you are in school at least half-time. An in-school deferment on subsidized loans means you won’t move into repayment until you leave school.

Federal Unsubsidized Loans – Some or all of your federal undergraduate student loan may be unsubsidized, which basically means that you are responsible for the interest, even while in school. You can still defer your payments if you attend at least half-time. But, the interest continues to build, and is capitalized at repayment. Capitalization is unpaid interest that your lender adds to the principal balance of a loan. Future interest then accrues on the larger balance. That can add up.

Private Loans – These loans are taken out from banks, credit bureaus, and other lending organizations. You can generally defer private loan payments while in school at least half-time. However, interest accrues and capitalizes at repayment as well. More information about private loans is located in U-fi From Nelnet’s Frequently Asked Questions.

Tip: Paying any of the interest on private loans or unsubsidized loans each month while in graduate school can help. It can amount to significant savings in the long run.

How do I find out about my undergraduate student loan and my in-school options?

You can go to the National Student Loan Database (NSLDS) to obtain information about your federal undergraduate student loan. There, you will see the types of loans you have and the terms of each. You can also see the federal loan servicer(s) to whom your loans have been assigned. To find out about your private loans and servicers, check with your lender. Federal and private loan servicers work with you during school. They are also responsible for billing, collection, and information services provided throughout your undergraduate student loan repayment period.

You may wonder how servicers will know that you are in school and eligible for deferment. Your federal servicer(s) receive notification of your in-school status. This happens when your school reports enrollment information as part of their regular administrative procedures. Federal servicers automatically place you in deferment status and notify you. Make sure your private loan servicers know you are in school. Contact them and submit any required information, if needed.

Tip: Your servicers can advise you about the best in-school payment options. For example, working at a non-profit organization or at certain income levels may put you on a different repayment track for federal loans. It’s wise to take advantage of your servicers’ individualized counseling before making any decisions about how to handle your loans before, during, or after graduate school.

Do I have other loan management options for my private loans?

If you took out private loans as an undergraduate, you may want to explore whether refinancing your loans into one new private loan is a viable option before entering graduate school. If your undergraduate private loans have higher interest rates than those currently available, or if you would like to combine multiple loans into one loan, refinancing may be a good choice for you. Private refinance loans are based on credit and you may need a cosigner to get the best rate. Refinance loans usually offer in-school deferment options if you attend school at least half-time. Interest accrues and will be capitalized at repayment.

Be cautious about including federal loans in a refinance loan. Even if the rate is lower, you will lose loan forgiveness, income-driven repayment options, and some other features available only in federal programs.

What about the loans I’ll take out while in grad school?

Since subsidized federal loans are not available to graduate students, interest accrues on both federal and private loans while you’re in school. If you are unable to make interest payments on all of your loans while in graduate school, consider paying interest on the highest rate loan(s) first. Any progress you can make on paying interest will put you in a better position when you move into loan repayment.

Talking with your federal and private loans servicers can help you determine the best options in your specific situation. Education loan management can seem complicated. Your servicers can look at your accounts and provide information about the best choices for you.

Ever taken out or refinanced your student loans? You probably know the interest rate of your loan, and may have seen the letters APR on your statement. (APR stands for Annual Percentage Rate.) Understanding the difference between the interest rate and the APR is important. While they both measure the cost of borrowing money, they are not the same. Knowing the difference could save you thousands of dollars on your student loans.

What is the difference between the student loan interest rate and the APR?

The interest rate on a student loan is the cost to borrow money. It is shown as a percentage. Your interest rate does not reflect any fees or other charges you may pay for the loan. The APR goes a step further. It takes the interest rate on a student loan and adds in any upfront costs, such as an origination fee. The APR is also a percentage, but it measures the total cost of borrowing money on an annual basis.

By law, private student loan issuers must show customers the APR. The law requires this to facilitate a clear understanding of the actual interest rates and fees applicable to their agreements. In the U.S., the calculation and disclosure of APR is governed by the Truth in Lending Act.

Tip: While U-fi From Nelnet and many private student loan lenders do not charge an origination fee, some lenders do. Be sure to carefully read the loan terms before applying for and accepting a loan.

Why is it important to know the APR if I know the student loan interest rate?

As mentioned above, the APR gives a more complete picture of the cost of borrowing. For student loans and student loan refinancing, if the lender doesn’t charge an origination fee and you immediately begin making full principal and interest payments, the interest rate and the APR will likely be the same. However, if the lender charges an origination fee or you defer making principal and/or interest payments while you are in school, your APR will not likely be the same as your interest rate. By looking at both the interest rate and the APR, you will be able to get a clearer picture of your expected monthly payment and the total cost of the loan.

Does the interest rate and APR tell the complete story?

Interest rates and the APRs are useful tools to help understand the cost of borrowing and to compare different loans. But, they don’t always tell the complete story. For instance, federal Direct Subsidized Loans, Direct Unsubsidized Loans, and Direct PLUS Loans come with an origination fee, but the fee is deducted from the loan disbursements, so the origination fee is not included in the APR. Thus, if you took out a $10,000 federal Direct PLUS Loan with its 4.272% origination fee, you would only receive $9,572.80, but you would have to pay back the entire $10,000, plus any accrued interest on the loan.

Also, the stated APR may or may not include any borrower benefits associated with the loan, such as an interest rate reduction for auto debit payments or cash back rewards for good grades. Some federal student loans also come with loan forgiveness programs, so be sure to take all these into account when comparing loan offers.

Tip: The interest rate and the APR for a variable rate student loan reflects the interest rate and costs at the time you take out the loan. If interest rates change, the APR changes as well.

Knowing the difference between APR and interest rate helps you make an informed decision when taking out student loans.

You’ve probably heard the term cosigner. But, do you know what it means, how it can help you, or what qualities make a good one? If you find your federal funds aren’t enough to cover the cost of college, consider applying for private student loans. Applying with a cosigner can help you qualify for a private student loan. It can be difficult for student borrowers to meet the criteria and income requirements by themselves. Learn if a cosigner is right for you.

What is a cosigner?

A cosigner is a person who signs for a loan with a borrower. If the borrower misses payments or defaults on the loan, the cosigner takes responsibility for payments and the remaining balance. Since both the borrower and cosigner have equal obligations, missed payments and default affect both their credit.

How does having a cosigner help me?

Including a cosigner on a loan decreases the risk for the lender. That’s because the lender has another person obligated to repay the loan if the borrower defaults. Cosigners allow the lender to take on less risk. Less risk increases the borrower’s chances of getting approved for the loan. It may also lead to better loan terms. These include lower interest rate or shorter repayment length. Both could save considerable money over the life of the loan.

Even if you qualify for a loan without a cosigner, the loan terms are generally not as favorable. However, wanting a cosigner to improve your loan terms and needing one for approval are two different circumstances. You may need a cosigner if you have no income or too little income, have no established credit or poor credit, your debt-to-income ratio is too high, or if you are either unemployed or recently changed jobs and don’t have an employment history. If any of these scenarios apply to you, you should consider applying with a cosigner to qualify for the loan. Applying with a cosigner gives you time to fix any of the above issues. It can also mean you can take out future loans on your own.

Who should I ask to cosign?

The most difficult part of choosing a cosigner is finding someone who is willing to sign on a loan with you and also has strong credit. Typically borrowers will turn to spouses, parents, or close friends to cosign. No matter who you choose, be sure your cosigner is financially stable. Other traits to look for in a credit-worthy cosigner include having a good job with a solid employment history and/or owning a home or other assets.

Asking someone to cosign on a loan with you is a big commitment, so make sure you are prepared. Tell your potential cosigner the reason you are asking them to cosign, your intentions to pay the loan back, and communicate to them that you can afford the payments. You can also ask your lender if there is a cosigner release option. Some loans will allow you to request that your cosigner be removed from the loan after a period of time if you meet certain requirements. Being prepared to answer any questions your potential cosigner has will show that you are serious about taking on the financial responsibilities of a loan.

Cosigning is a big commitment for both the borrower and the cosigner and should not be taken lightly. Make sure both you and your cosigner understand all terms and are clear on the responsibilities of the loan prior to signing.

Financial aid is awarded in many forms, and as a student, it is important to know all of your options before deciding which awards to accept. You’ll want to compare the aid and calculate the remaining costs of all the schools you are considering. Eligible students may receive an award letter or a financial aid package.

The Financial Aid Process

Submitting your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is an important first step to ensure your financial aid eligibility is considered. Your program must first accept you for admission, you must complete your FAFSA, and submit any other information your school requires. To be in the best position, complete all steps on or before each school’s published deadlines. When schools receive your FAFSA information, they calculate your family’s Estimated Financial Contribution (EFC). Your family’s actual financial contribution and the composition of your award letter may differ among schools. Your EFC is deducted from the total Cost of Attendance (COA) to determine your financial need. If you are eligible for financial aid, your award letter will contain all of the aid programs you are eligible to receive, the steps you need to take, and the deadlines for responding to the award letter.

Note: Although you will see your EFC on the Student Aid Report you received after filing the FAFSA, it is probably not the amount you and your family will actually pay for college. For more information, review the article I Submitted My FAFSA – Is the Expected Family Contribution What I Have to Pay for College? When you review your award letter, read all information, understand each program, and know your obligations to ensure you receive the funds. You will need to select the awards you would like to accept and respond to your award letter by the date indicated.

Types of Financial Aid

There are several different types of financial aid including grants, scholarships, federal work-study, and loans. The terms of each type of aid vary, so it is important to understand the differences.

Grants are typically based on financial need and do not need to be repaid. They may include funds from federal, state, and institutional sources. Programs apply grants to your college bill.

Scholarships are based on academics or other performance criteria, financial need, or a combination of both and do not have to be repaid. Scholarships usually come from institutional or private sources who apply funds to your college bill.

Federal work-study may be listed on your award letter, but in order to receive the funds, you must obtain a qualifying job and work to earn this type of financial aid from federal and institutional sources. Your financial aid office will post eligible jobs that are open to qualifying students. Once you secure a job, you’ll receive paychecks throughout the year for your hours worked. Work study does not apply funds to your college bill.

Loans are funds you borrow now and pay back with interest after you finish or leave school. They may come from federal, institutional, or private sources. For most loans, you will be required to take additional steps to secure the funds. If you receive a loan, it is applied to your bill. Many loans also charge fees, which are deducted from your loan amount. Be sure to read all of the loan terms before you borrow.

Determining the Amount You Owe After Financial Aid

Remember, colleges bill you for some costs prior to the start of each semester. The bill typically includes tuition and fees plus room and board charges if you live on campus. You will also have additional expenses such as books, transportation, and personal expenses that will not be included in your bill. Schools factor in all of this criteria when determining your overall cost of education. Your award letter outlines the total for each type of expense.

To determine the amount you will pay at each school, first deduct your grants and scholarships, then loans (minus fees) from your estimated college bill. Your school evenly divides and credits most aid to each semester’s bill.

You will also need to consider the cost of books and supplies at the beginning each semester, and any personal and transportation expenses you may have throughout each semester. If you have financial aid left after your school applies funds to your bill, you can use it to help with these expenses. Obtaining a work-study job can also help with personal expenses. As a general rule, it’s best to have additional funds set aside to help with personal expenses as well.

To continue to receive aid, you will need to make satisfactory academic progress toward your degree. Scholarships may require that you achieve a certain grade point average or meet other performance criteria. Programs also include renewal information with your award letter.

Additional Funds to Help Cover College Costs

In addition to the financial aid listed above, there are alternate sources that can help cover the cost of college.

Private Scholarships

There are a number of private scholarships available, which you can search for with Peterson’s College Scholarship Search. Your guidance counselor can also be a great resource for private scholarship information. Private scholarships can help offset the amount you need to borrow.

Direct PLUS Loans

These are federal loans that some schools may include in an award letter. Direct PLUS Loans are subject to certain eligibility requirements. Typically graduate or professional degree students or parents of a dependent undergraduate student are eligible to receive these loans.

Private Loans

As an alternative, private loans can also assist with covering college expenses. Private student loans, sometimes known as alternative loans, are made by private lenders such as banks, credit unions, and financial institutions. Private student loans are based on credit and are most often used to fill the gap between the cost of attending college and family savings, grants, scholarships, and federal student loans.

Paying for school can feel like an overwhelming process. It’s crucial to meet all of your deadlines to be considered for eligibility. Mapping out your deadlines on a calendar can help keep these details organized. Make sure you consult the available resources and fully understand each step of the process to get the most out of financial aid.

Considering paying off your student loan debt with your tax return or just a lump sum of money? There can be more to larger payments than meets the eye. Follow these steps to learn how to make the most of your lump sum payment.

1. Make a List

Knowing which loans you want to pay off first will help you get the most bang for your buck. Make a list of all of your federal and private student loans, the balances, and the interest rates. Then, based on your goals, weigh your options. You could put your lump sum payment toward your highest interest rate loans, or pay off your low-balance loans first. Paying off your highest interest rate loans reduces the amount of interest you pay. It also saves you money over the life of the loan. Paying off your lowest balance loans first could save you money on your monthly payment. Paying off your lower-balance loans allows you to put money saved from a lower payment toward your other student loans. This can help you to pay them off faster.

2. Talk to Your Loan Servicer

Check to make sure your loan servicer knows how you want your payments applied to your student loans. If you pay above the minimum payment and don’t specify how you want payments applied, your loan servicer decides for you.

Below is a sample letter put together by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) that you can send to your loan servicer to ensure payments above your minimum monthly payment amount are being applied to the correct loan(s). For some loan servicers, this can be done online.

I am writing to provide you instructions on how to apply excess payments greater than the minimum amount due. Please apply payments as follows:

  1. After applying the minimum amount due for each loan, apply any additional amount to the loan accruing the highest interest rate.
  2. If there are multiple loans with the same interest rate, please apply the additional amount to the loan with the lowest outstanding principal balance.
  3. If any additional amount above the minimum amount due ends up paying off an individual loan, please then apply any remaining part of my payment to the loan with the next highest interest rate.

It is possible that I may find an option to refinance my loans to a lower rate with another lender. If this lender or any third party makes payments to my account on my behalf, use the instructions outlined above.

Retain these instructions. Please apply these instructions to all future overpayments. Please confirm these payments will be processed as specified. Otherwise, please provide an explanation as to why you are unable to follow these instructions.

3. Things to Keep In Mind

There are a few other things to be mindful of once you’ve decided where to apply your lump sum payment.

  1. Follow up with your loan servicer. Call or check your accounts online to make sure your payment was applied as specified.
  2. Making a payment larger than your minimum payment amount can sometimes advance your due date. This means another payment on your student loans won’t be due until your minimum payments catch up to your lump sum payment. While it can be nice to skip a few months of student loan payments, your loans still accrue interest and won’t save you any money. Even if your due date advances, continue to make your monthly payments to save yourself money in the long run.
  3. You can also save money on your student loans by refinancing. Refinancing allows you to combine both your federal and private student loans into a new loan with a new repayment term and interest rate, which can often save money over the life of the loan, or help lower your monthly payment.

Paying off your student loans is a great accomplishment. As you begin to make decisions around your personal finances, make sure to keep these tips in mind so that you can make the best choices for your financial future.

When you’ve recently entered the workforce, balancing repaying student loans and a budget can be a challenge. This is especially true if you have a standard entry-level salary. As the cost of higher education continues to rise, it becomes increasingly difficult to manage high monthly loan payments. You also need to worry about everyday expenses like rent, car payments, utilities, and groceries. At times, it feels like you have to make a choice between repaying student loans and living your life.

No matter what some newspaper columnists might lead you to believe, defaulting on your loans is never a good idea. Instead, tap into that survival instinct you developed in the classroom. Get serious about repaying those student loans – the smart way. Here are five ways to manage your loan payments as a young professional.

Stay in contact with your loan servicers.

There are generally two categories of student loans: federal and private. Regardless of the category, student loan servicers handles billing, payments, customer inquiries, and other administrative services for your loan. Servicers help you navigate loan repayment systems, find the right repayment plan, and answer your student loan questions. If you don’t know who services your federal loans, you can find out at nslds.ed.gov. This site lists all of your federal loans, along with the contact information for your servicer. To obtain contact information for your private loan servicer, review your lender’s website or call their toll-free number.

Know which questions to ask.

The questions you should ask depend on your loan type. For federal loans, ask if you’re on the right payment schedule for your financial situation. There are a variety of repayment options available. Your servicer uses information about your job, income, and federal loan amount borrowed to help you find the repayment plan that’s best for you. Options include payments based on your current income, or payments that increase periodically over the life of your loan. Whichever option you choose, remember to keep a long-term view when making decisions about repayment schedules. Consider the interest implications of any option. Private loans are different. You selected repayment terms at the time of application. Information about your private loan rates, terms, and repayment can be obtained from your private loan servicer. They can also offer information and support throughout the life of your loan.

Consider consolidation.

Depending on what type of loan(s) you have, consolidation may help you save money. If you have one or more federal loans, a federal consolidation loan can combine your loans into a new loan with a blended interest rate. It may also extend your repayment period. When you talk with your servicers, you may want to discuss this option. You can find more information about consolidation and federal loan repayment at the Federal Student Aid website.

Private student loan refinancing allows you to replace your existing private and/or federal student loans with a new private student loan under different terms. If you are repaying multiple student loans, want to lower your monthly payment, or if your interest rates are higher than you would like, you may want to consider private loan refinancing. Private student loans require a credit check, and you can often get a lower interest rate with a cosigner. Most lenders provide loans with no application or origination fees. You may also prepay your loan at any time without penalty. You will have the opportunity to see your rates and terms before finalizing your loan.

Do your research.

If you have student loans with high interest rates, refinancing with a private loan can be a great option. They may allow you to save money over the life of your loans with a lower interest rate. But private loan refinancing isn’t right for everyone. For instance, if you have federal loans that carry special repayment benefits or forgiveness programs, it might be best to explore federal loan consolidation. There are unique benefits to both, so be sure to do your research.

Stay current on your monthly student loan payments.

The consequences of defaulting on education loans are very serious. If you’re not able to make your payments, contact your student loan servicer before becoming delinquent. They have trained representatives who can help you find the best solution for your needs. If you lose your job or experience other difficulties, you may be eligible for deferments or forbearances. These mean you may stop making payments for a period of time.

When it comes to repaying student loans, there are many ways to build a healthy financial future. Staying in touch with your servicer and being aware of the options available to you are some of the best ways to make smart financial decisions.