Tag Archive for: Refinancing

Does your January credit card statement have you feeling blue? Find out how personal loans could provide credit relief.

It Happens to the Best of Us

The holidays have come and gone. You may be feeling a bit relieved that all the seasonal hustle and bustle is over. Sure, it may be a bit cold outside. Sure, work is back in full swing. But, things are looking good with your New Year’s resolutions. You’re feeling optimistic and energized.

Then, you receive your January credit card bill. Whoa, the new balance is much higher than you expected. As you go down the list of purchases on your statement you ask yourself, “Did I really spend that much?” You also notice the available credit on your credit card is pretty low. There are some big purchases coming up in your future. You were planning on using your credit card to pay for them. Now, you no longer have enough available credit to pay for everything as planned.

With average credit card APRs over 16%, and many exceeding 20%, you know if you don’t pay your balance in full you’ll be hit with a hefty finance charge, which will be added to your outstanding credit card balance. And even worse, if you’re late making the minimum payment that’s due, you could be hit with a penalty APR, which can be as high as 29.99%.

Personal Loans Could Provide Credit Relief

This is where personal loans could provide credit relief. Unlike a credit card, which is a revolving line of credit, a personal loan is an unsecured loan that doesn’t require any collateral, such as a car or house. Personal loans come with a specific repayment period, usually between 1 and 7 years. Fixed interest rates are more common than variable interest rates, and some lenders will offer you a choice.

The main reason people take out personal loans is to pay off existing debt, such as high interest rate credit cards or loans. Other common reasons include making major purchases, for home improvement projects, for special occasions like weddings, to take a vacation, and to pay off medical bills.

Personal loans can range from as little as $1,000 to as high as $100,000. APRs vary widely among lenders and are based on the borrower’s (or co-signer’s) credit history, annual income, repayment term selected, and type of interest rate chosen. Some personal loans even come with money saving automatic payment discounts and loyalty discounts.

Tip: Some lenders charge upfront fees, which add to the total cost of the loan, so be sure to take that into account before choosing a lender.

A really nice feature for personal loans is how quick and easy the process can be. If you submit a completed loan application, you can receive a decision in a matter of minutes, and if approved, receive funds in your bank account as soon as the next business day, provided your application has no typos or errors.

Now that the holidays are over, you may be suffering from the post-holiday credit card blues. If so, check out a personal loan for credit relief from U-fi’s partner. It just may be what the doctor ordered.

If you have student loan debt, you have most likely heard the terms “student loan consolidation” and “student loan refinancing”. Although they sound similar and are often used interchangeably, they are actually two different programs. Therefore, understanding these programs and their key differences can help you make better student loan repayment decisions.

Student Loan Consolidation

Student loan consolidation lets you combine one or more eligible federal student loans into one new Direct Consolidation Loan. As a result, the U.S. Department of Education becomes the new lender. As the administrator of the program, they use companies such as Nelnet to originate and service the loans.

Student Loan Refinancing

Student loan refinancing is offered by private (non-federal) lenders to allow student loan borrowers to refinance one or more federal and/or private student loans into a new private student loan. Consequently, the lender of the new private student loan will be a bank, credit union, or other financial institution. Either the lender themselves or entities like Firstmark Services, a division of Nelnet, handles origination and servicing.

Which is Better?

Both programs offer many benefits. These benefits include simplifying your monthly student loan payments, locking in a fixed interest rate, and lowering your monthly payments. However, there may be some drawbacks as well. For example, if you extend your repayment term, you could increase the total cost of your loans. Therefore, you may forfeit current and potential future federal student loan benefits. Also, any incentives attached to your current loans, such as interest rate reductions for automatic payments, are lost.

Comparing Options

The table below provides a side-by-side comparison of several important features of student loan consolidation and student loan refinancing.

Student Loan ConsolidationStudent Loan Refinancing*
LenderU.S. Department of EducationBanks, Credit Unions, and Financial Institutions
Credit Check RequiredNoYes
Upfront FeesNoneMost lenders do not charge any upfront fees
Interest Rate TypeFixedFixed and variable rate options are offered by most lenders
Interest RateWeighted average interest rate of the loans being consolidated, rounded up to nearest one-eighth of 1%Varies. Factors may include the borrower’s and/or cosigner’s credit history; repayment term; interest rate type; highest level of education; and current market conditions
Repayment PlansStandard, Graduated, Extended, and various Income-Driven Repayment plansStandard Repayment
Repayment Term10 to 30 years depending on the amount being consolidated5 to 20 years
Allowable LoansMost federal student loans are eligible. Private loans are not eligibleFederal and private student loans are allowed by most lenders
Interest Rate ReductionRate reduction for automatic paymentsRate reduction for automatic payments. Some lenders offer an additional rate reduction to existing customers with a qualifying account
Ability to consolidate or refinance multiple timesGenerally no, unless additional federal loans are includedYes
Loss of Federal BenefitsSome benefits may be lostYes, including potentially qualifying for Public Service Loan Forgiveness on federal loans
When can you consolidate or refinanceAfter graduation, leaving school, or dropping below half-time enrollmentAfter graduation, leaving school, or dropping below half-time enrollment. Some lenders allow refinancing while in school

* Features represent those of the largest and/or most common private student loan refinancing programs. A specific lender’s features may differ, so be sure to read the program details carefully.

Choose the Right Option for You

While there are similarities between student loan consolidation and student loan refinancing, they are different programs with unique features. Firstly, if you are interested in consolidating or refinancing your current student loans,determine what you want to accomplish. Your goal may be to lower your monthly payments, lock in a low fixed interest rate, and/or lower your overall cost of repaying your loans. Next, compare the federal government’s Direct Consolidation Loan program to U-fi and other private lender programs once your goal has been set. Then, decide if consolidation or refinancing is right for you based on your financial goals and circumstances.

Want to reduce your monthly payments? Learn how to make it happen with U-fi.

Thinking about applying for a new private student loan, or refinancing your existing federal and private student loans? Expect the lender to check your credit history and credit score. They do this to ensure you are not a credit risk. You can proactively take steps to improve your credit health and raise your credit score. Start with understanding what’s in your credit report, and what student loan lenders are looking for.

What is Credit?

Have you ever taken out a student loan or credit card? If so, you entered into an agreement to receive funds that must be paid back later. Unlike credit cards, student loans are repaid in installments over a set number of payments. This term is usually 5 to 25 years.

When you take out a student loan, most lenders or servicers notify at least one of the three major credit reporting agencies. These are Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion. They do this so they can include the new account on your credit report as a trade line. Each trade line contains detailed information. This information includes account name and number, loan type, date opened, original and current balance, payment status, and monthly payment.

The lender or servicer notifies the credit agencies of all loan activity. This activity includes payment date, amount of payment applied to principal and interest, and timeliness of payments. The credit agency records this information, which makes up part of your credit history.

Understanding Your Credit Report

While each credit reporting agency’s reporting format may be slightly different, they essentially include the same information:

  • Personal Information, such as your name, address (current and previous), Social Security number, date of birth, and other information that identifies who you are.
  • Credit History, including your open and closed accounts, original loan amounts, current balances, and payment history.
  • Public Records, such as delinquent accounts, liens, and bankruptcies. Public records can remain on your credit report for many years, which will affect your ability to obtain future credit.
  • Credit Inquires, which are placed on your credit report when you request credit. Credit inquires remain on your file for two years.

Tip: Federal law entitles you to a free copy of your credit report each year from all three credit reporting agencies. Take advantage of this and check your report from each credit bureau annually. This ensures your personal information is accurate and up to date. To get a free credit report, visit www.AnnualCreditReport.com or call 877-FACTACT. If something on your report looks inaccurate, be sure to contact the credit agency immediately to have it addressed. Unfortunately the credit reports will not include your credit score.

What Student Loan Lenders Look For When Checking Your Credit

When making a credit decision, private student loan lenders check your credit report and credit score. They do this to determine whether you are an acceptable risk, and what interest rate they should charge you. If you have a cosigner, lender check their credit report and credit score too.  Most lenders, like U-fi, will want to see an adequate credit history, a track record of making on-time payments, how much debt you have outstanding, and a good credit score. Lenders also ask how much income you have to determine whether you, or your cosigner, have enough monthly income to make monthly payments.

To increase your chances of being approved and receiving a low interest rate for a new student loan or a student refinance loan, you and/or your cosigner will want to have at least two open trade lines, be no more than 30 days past due on more than one account, and have no public records for the past five years. Most lenders will also want to see a good credit score. While each lender is different, if you have a credit score above 700, you will generally be considered a good credit risk.

Tip: When shopping for a private student loan or student refinance loan you should complete all your applications within a short window (e.g. 30 days), since multiple credit inquires within a brief time period will have little impact on your credit score.

How Does Your Credit History Affect Your Credit Score?

Your credit score is a number that summarizes your credit risk at any moment in time. While there are several types of credit scores, 90% of lending decisions use a FICO score. Fair Isaac Corporation creates the FICO score. FICO scores range from a low of 300 to a high of 850, with higher being better. FICO scores are made up of the following:

  • 35%: Payment History – have you made your past payments on time?
  • 30%: Amount Owed – how much debt do you owe and how much of your available credit has been used?
  • 15%: Length of Credit History – how long have you been using credit?
  • 10%: New Credit – how much of your debt has been opened recently?
  • 10%: Types of Credit Used – do you have different types of credit such as credit cards, installment loans, and mortgages?

Tip: FICO scores can change from month to month due to several factors. Not having too much debt, and making full payments on time, over a long period gives lenders more confidence you will repay them. That increases the likelihood they will extend you credit at a lower interest rate.

Understanding what’s on your credit report and how it impacts your ability to get a good credit rate is extremely important. If you notice something incorrect on your credit report, call the credit agency immediately. Work with them to correct any problems. A better credit history and higher credit score means a better shot at approval and a low interest rate. Your credit could save you a lot of money on your student loans. It can also ensure additional credit is there for you when you need it most.