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Congratulations, you’ve graduated college! You’re ready to begin your new life in the real world with a real job! This step into adulthood is very exciting, but it can also be a time of confusion with new responsibilities. Set yourself up for financial success early by following these financial tips, including planning emergency savings.

Salary Expectations

Many college students graduate with an unrealistic expectation their salary earnings for the first years after college. Accenture conducted an online U.S. survey in March of 2015 consisting of 1,001 students graduating from college in 2015 and 1,002 participants who graduated college in 2013 or 2014. The survey found that 85 percent of 2015 graduates expected to earn more than $25,000 a year after graduation. While the reality is, 41 percent of working 2013 and 2014 graduates actually earn $25,000 or less a year. Even though you have a college degree, you will likely start your career at an entry level position. It will be important for you to make a budget aligned with your salary.

Budgeting

Once you land a job and start earning a steady income, it can be tempting to carelessly spend money. It’s time to make a budget. There are several worksheets, like this one (PDF), that can help you get started. Make sure that your monthly income minus your monthly expenses is a positive number. If not, you will need to cut back in areas or get a part time job in order to live within your means.

Now is a good time to start planning for the future. What are your short and long term goals? Are you currently living at home, but want to get your own place? Do you have an emergency savings account set up in case you lose your job? These are all things that you should budget for. Also keep in mind future expenses, like student loan repayment, that will be coming your way. Typically six months after graduation, your loans will exit their grace period and you will need to begin making payments. Make sure you’re prepared for repayment by following these four steps.

Savings

Ever heard of the term, “pay yourself first?” This is a phrase typically used for any type of savings or retirement plans. Pay yourself first means putting a specified portion of your paycheck to savings or retirement before spending anywhere else. The best way to do this is to set up a direct withdrawal from your account whenever you get paid. That way, the money is already in your savings or retirement account before you even see it. If you have money for savings, there are two areas you should focus on to set yourself up for financial success: retirement and emergency funds.

Saving for retirement as early as possible gives your money more time to grow before you retire. According to Bankrate.com, if you save $2,000 a year starting at age 25, you would have approximately $560,000 in retirement savings by age 65, assuming 8 percent annual growth. If you save that same $2,000 a year and have the same 8 percent growth rate, but don’t start until age 35, you will only have $245,000 by age 65. That is a loss of $315,000 just because you started 10 years later.

Emergency Savings

An emergency savings fund money you save for emergencies only, like a loss of a job. It is typically suggested that you have enough emergency funds to cover at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses. For example, if you have $2,000 in monthly living expenses, you should have anywhere from $6,000 to $12,000 saved in your emergency savings account. People that don’t have emergency funds and lose their job can often end up living off of credit cards with high interest rates. This can not only put you in debt that you may have a hard time getting out of, but it will also hurt your credit history, which can take a long time to rebuild.

It may be difficult at first, but saving early in life will benefit you in the long run. Accounting for a realistic salary and sticking to a budget that allows you to put a little money away lays the foundation for a fiscally responsible future. Be smart with your money and you’ll be on your way to a financially successful life.

Spring break is a time that college students look forward to all winter. It’s your chance to escape the rigors of the classroom and relax on a warm beach or other exciting destination. Although spring break can be fun, the costs associated can add up quickly. With a little planning and preparation, you can enjoy a week away from studying without emptying your bank account. Use these five planning tips for a successful spring break.

1. Set Your Budget

The best thing you can do is plan your spring break trip a few months in advance. This will not only give you ample time to get everything organized, but you’ll have more time to save and plan for your trip. Determine what your budget is and let that guide you’re planning. Then, take the time to research destinations and estimate the costs for each option. Transportation and lodging will likely make up the bulk of your cost, but don’t underestimate your other expenses during your trip. You may find that some trips are just too expensive based on your resources and budget.

2. Split the Bill

If you’re driving to your destination, ride with friends and split the cost of fuel. Additionally, you may be able to save on hotel costs by sharing a room with friends. Those extra savings can go a long way and will give you more funds for other activities during your trip.

3. Borrow – Don’t Buy

Create a packing list and figure out if there are items you don’t have but know you will need. It’s a pretty safe bet that buying something will be more expensive at your destination. Try to borrow anything you might need from friends or family, especially if it’s an item you’re unlikely to use after the trip. Try your best to anticipate everything you’ll need during your trip and pack accordingly.

4. Find Fun Closer to Home

Although it sounds great to take a big trip somewhere far away, you can have just as much fun trying new things closer to home. Remember, the entire purpose of spring break is to take a break from studying, relax, and enjoy yourself. Sometimes, that might simply be going home to see family and friends. And the best part of that kind of spring break is you won’t have to spend much money at all! Check out tourist destinations in your current city to explore new activities. You’d be surprised at how many things are nearby that you may have overlooked previously. Get creative and enjoy yourself.

5. Pay as You Go

Ideally, you want to be able to pay for your spring break trip with savings and not use high interest rate credit cards or even student loans to fund your adventure. Again, try to set a budget for your trip and then keep your spending within your budget. Don’t be tempted into spending more than you have or feel pressured into trying to keep up with someone else’s crazy spending sprees. Spring break can create memories that last a lifetime, but you don’t want create a financial burden that lasts a lifetime either!

Enjoy your spring break and the time away from your classes. Remember to be safe and protect yourself and your belongings while traveling. A little planning and budgeting will help you have a great time and feel good about your finances when you return.