What Careers Give You The Most Bang For Your Buck

Finances | By Ron Hancock

There are many career paths that will set you up for financial success, but some of them require more time to earn a degree in order to get the job you want. When deciding whether extra education is worth pursuing, consider job opportunities it will make available, as well as earning potential and growth. Once you’ve made career decisions, U-fi can help make your dreams a reality with smarter student loan solutions. Here are just a few of those careers you might be dreaming of.

Careers in Healthcare

If making money is important to you, becoming a healthcare professional is something you might want to consider. In a recent CNBC article listing the 25 best-paying jobs in 2019, 15 of those spots belong to healthcare professionals – the highest being anesthesiologists at an average salary of $265,990.

While many jobs in medicine and healthcare have high stress levels and require years of additional schooling, they can also offer numerous job opportunities and high-paying, emotionally rewarding careers. There are also some medical careers that aren’t as stressful and give you a great work-life balance, like dentistry and optometry.

Law Careers

In 2019, the average lawyer earns a salary of $141,890. This is another top-paying career option that you could consider. Again, it’s not perfect for everyone, as you must go through extra years of law school, and being an attorney can be extremely stressful in certain situations like trials. But if you have a passion for justice and order, a career in law could be perfect for you.

Engineering and Computer Science

The average salaries for flight engineers, petroleum engineers, and computer and information systems managers are all above $140,000. These are some of the highest paying jobs in the market, but it gets even better. Most of these jobs only require four years of college, as opposed to some of the other careers featured above. If math, science, or computers make you tick, a career in engineering or computer science could be in your future.

Management

Another lucrative career option is being a leader of people. Knowing how to manage other human beings and figure out how they can perform at the best possible level is a skill in high demand. Many careers in marketing and sales management can earn over $130,000, on average. While the required education may vary for these careers, you will likely need additional years of experience in your respective field before you can effectively direct and coordinate others in their job duties.

Finances

It should come as no surprise that a career centered on handling money pays pretty well. Helping people take care of their hard-earned cash is a great way to earn some hard-earned cash of your own. Financial managers earn an average salary of $143,530, and personal financial advisors earned $124,140 in 2019. Another added bonus to a career in finance is that you generally need just four years of school before you can start making money by making other people money. If you want your Master’s degree or an MBA, it will likely add on another two or four years of schooling.

Pursuing a career in the field you’re passionate about is an essential part of living a fulfilled life. If you need financial help to reach your education goals, U-fi can help you get on the fast track to success. Once you have your degree and a job lined up, it’ll all be worth it.

You put in the work, we’ll help you reap the rewards. U-fi can put you on the path toward your dream career with smarter student loan solutions. Get started today.

Ron Hancock

Written By:

Ron Hancock is the Regional Director for U‑fi Student Loans and is an expert in many aspects of financial aid, student loans, and debt management. A graduate of the University of Oklahoma, Ron has worked in a number of areas of higher education finance, including positions in a college financial aid office, training and development for a state agency, and most recently as National Manager for Nelnet’s Partner Solutions team. Ron has spoken at numerous financial aid conferences all across the United States.

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